Tag Archives: music

Music Compositions 2021

Hello Everyone. I’m still getting things on this blog (and in life) organized for 2021 (11 January). I’ve decided (at least for a while) to add postings of music compositions to this page as they get created (rather than lumber people by posting new pages with new music compositions all the time). The angst wrought by having UNposted (and possibly valueless) compositions lying around is debilitating (I find (and you will possibly find too once you hit a certain age)).

So this page will act like an index (and anyone interested will simply now and again have a peek to see if there’s anything new).

To be honest, I don’t like having any composition UNposted. (What if I dropped dead and a masterpiece was left undiscovered (permanently)?). I would be relegated to the stature of a Rimsky-Korsakov rather than that of a Stravinsky!

So this “index” will give date, title, musical instrument, duration, and link to both audio and (usually) written music. Even though there’s a copyright notice on the page I long for the day when something of mine was considered worthy of pinching.

The picture has nothing to do with anything. The tree is the “China Doll Tree” in my garden and New Zealand doesn’t have hummingbirds.

Music Compositions 2021

  1. 11 January – Whimsy 1 – for piano (1’24”) – audio HERE and the pdf HERE.
  2. 11 January – Whimsy 2 – for piano (1’24”) – audio HERE and the pdf HERE.

Music 362: Piano Sonata No. 3 in E minor

Hi Everyone

Here is a sonata (3 movements) for the piano. It will probably be the last bit of music for the year. The computer is playing them as my mic is broken – and besides, bits of the sonata are getting beyond my ability to play them.

I’m not expecting everyone to sit down for quarter of an hour to listen as they’re a bit arty-farty in places, but if you’re interested here it is! (Note: my autocorrect keeps changing “arty-farty” to “arty-party”.) It is called “Piano Sonata in E minor”; it starts in E minor but I quickly got distracted!

Thanks

Click on a title to listen to each of the three Movements:

1st Movement
2nd Movement
3rd Movement

Click on a title to download the written music of each of the three Movements:

1st Movement
2nd Movement
3rd Movement

1887. The Harmonious Blacksmith

It was Grandma Hilda’s 75th birthday coming up. She loved to hear twelve year old granddaughter, Lydia, play the piano. Grandma Hilda liked old-fashioned music. Not that Lydia didn’t, so Lydia thought she would surprise Grandma Hilda by playing a piece specially learnt for the birthday. Lydia thought and thought and thought. In the end, she decided to learn Handel’s The Harmonious Blacksmith. She practised and practised and practised. It was quite hard, even though she was very good at playing the piano.

Grandma Hilda’s birthday arrived. Lydia and her parents went to visit.

“Happy Birthday Grandma!” said Lydia. “I’ve learnt a special piece on the piano for you!”

“That’s lovely dear,” said Grandma Hilda. “As long as it’s not a piece by that awful composer called Handel. His music goes boom, boom, boom, and I can’t stand it.”

“No,” said Lydia. “It’s by Scarlatti.”

Grandma loved it. She didn’t know the difference. In the circumstance it’s possible that Handel wouldn’t have minded.

Music 352: Dancing in wet sand while wearing a mask

Happy 4th of July to my USA friends!

This piece of music today was a lockdown composition. I grew tired of hearing that one could walk on wet sand but not on dry sand, like we were cats looking for the “kitty-litter”.

[For those who like a more academic approach to music listening (and presumably in this case it’s not many of you because these things don’t matter!) this piece of music is not spontaneously played upon a keyboard. I took a 12-tone serial row by Arnold Schoenberg, made a grid out of it, and composed using only the diagonals on the grid. Whatever!]

Anyways – it brightened my day. I hope it brightens yours!

If the above link doesn’t play, then try clicking HERE!

Music 351: Scherzo for Woodwind

Here is a piece of music for four woodwind players: Flute, English Horn, Bb Clarinet, and Bassoon.

Have a nice day!

Thanks
Bruce

Click below to hear the piece:

If the above link doesn’t play, then try clicking HERE!

Click here to download a printable copy of the music

1819. The child prodigy

(Warning: there could be swearing)

Cornelius Dresdomida-Heregofinsopt was the most astonishing child prodigy since Adam was a boy. He was a musician. His two main instruments were piano and piccolo. You wouldn’t believe what he could do with a piccolo! Astonishing!

Since the age of five he had shown a remarkable talent for piano, and he celebrated his tenth birthday by playing Dmitri Smith’s 14th Piano Concerto in A minor accompanied by the Ulaanbaatar Symphony Orchestra.

Reviews were stunning. The fact that he played one of his own compositions as an encore proved that the world was on the cusp of discovering a talent so divine it made Bach look like a headless chicken.

Cornelius went on to become one of the greats of all time. Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Dresdomida-Heregofinsopt tripped off everyone’s tongue. Not only that, but he became the richest musician ever to hit the world stage. He was regarded as a phenomenon; a living icon; the incarnation of Michael the Archangel. Then he died, well into his eighties, leaving a body of work so vast that people were in disbelief.

Except none of this happened. Because when he was five years old and asked his parents if he could learn the piano, his father simply said, “No kid of mine is going to grow up a fuckin’ pansy.”

And that was that.

Music 350: Fo(u)r Woodwind

Well, I couldn’t stop myself – so here is a piece of music for four woodwind players: Oboe, Cor Anglais, Clarinet, and Bassoon.

Have a nice day!

Thanks
Bruce

Click below to hear the piece:

If the above link doesn’t play, then try clicking HERE!

Click here to download a printable copy of the music

Music 349: Waltz (for bassoon and piano)

Here is a piece for piano and bassoon – again, played on the computer – so it won’t be as exciting as in the real! It is a waltz.

It’s really the fourth of four woodwind pieces of a set on this blog (flute, oboe, clarinet, and bassoon), although I have a fairly definite suspicion that they’ll never get played! However, I enjoyed writing them!

The wrong notes are intentional! I like wrong notes. When I was learning the piano I had wrong notes all over the place. Just play them without being a fuss-pot and they’ll sound better than good. A lot of my music has bum notes in it to teach purists a jolly good lesson!

This will be the last bit of music I’ll post for a while as they’re not the most popular things I post. However I will continue to potter with music in the lurking depths of secrecy. As a teacher told me, maybe 60 years ago, “Write for the waste paper bin. Write for the waste paper bin every day.” I’ve never quite got out of the habit of throwing things away.

Have a nice day!

Thanks
Bruce

Click below to hear the piece:

If the above link doesn’t play, then try clicking HERE!

Click here to download a printable copy of the music

Music 348: Helter-Skelter (for Bb clarinet and piano)

Here is a piece for piano and B-flat clarinet – again, played on the computer – so it won’t be as exciting as in the real!

It’s called “Helter-Skelter”. The piano part in particular should be played with a great deal of abandonment!

The clarinet part is written for the Bb clarinet, so it will be in the wrong key to play along with on most other instruments. If you want a copy of the clarinet part to play on a C instrument, just email me!

Thanks
Bruce

Click below to hear the piece:

If the above link doesn’t play, then try clicking HERE!

Click here to download a printable copy of the music

Music 347: Magpies (for flute and piano)

Here is a piece for piano and flute – again, played on the computer – so it won’t be as exciting as in the real!

It’s called “Magpies” because the middle section sort of sounds like magpies gabbling away in the trees. At least, it sounds a bit like the magpies we have here in New Zealand (which were introduced from Australia in the 1860s to combat pastoral insect pests).

Thanks
Bruce

Click below to hear the piece:

If the above link doesn’t play, then try clicking HERE!

Click here to download a printable copy of the music