About

Welcome! My name is Bruce. The goat gravatar is my goat Billy, the only one who understands me.

When I was born my parents ran a pub in the provincial New Zealand town of Whanganui. We then moved onto cattle, sheep, and dairy farms.

I taught Music and Drama for a year or two or more. Part of my life has been spent in North America – a lasting and wonderful influence. I have written over 60 plays and directed lots of theatre. For a time I was librarian at an isolated country school with students aged 4 to 18. I loved it, but the Head Master was a total prick so I told him to shove it. (I put that nicely).

These days I live just out of Stratford (a little town in a bump that sticks out half way up to the left of New Zealand’s North Island). I’m next to a volcano (Mount Taranaki) that hasn’t erupted since 1795 or something.

nz

The volcanos on the other side of my house a bit further away (Mounts Ruapehu, Tongariro and Ngauruhoe) usually smoke away happily and occasionally explode.

mts

I work from home formatting chemical safety documents prior to their being translated into numerous languages (at least I did that until these lockdowns put a halt to any security). I also teach piano and pipe organ to anyone who is talented but can’t afford a teacher as good as me (at least I did that until these lockdowns put a halt to any security)!

I am interested in gardening, playing keyboard music, learning and creating computer stuff, writing, composing, cooking (not very good at it – they call me “the master of the bland”), making pickles (chutneys, sauces, jams, jellies, preserves, that sort of thing), photography…

Below are some pictures to prove that pigeons can age one dramatically. See if you can pick the real Cloven Ruminant. Hint: he’s digesting the news.

50 thoughts on “About

  1. umashankar

    Bruce, you are a bend in the monotonous expanse of the time-space continuum. Lives don’t get as picturesque (or picaresque?) as that anymore. You are the last of the Huckleberry Finns. And yet, you have the staying power of an Everest.

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    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      You have me giggling in my abode, thank you! Sometimes I think you, me, and a couple of others, are the only ones on WordPress? Anyway – Everest is slowly sinking into the sea (I think). Thanks again for the comment – I giggle graciously, nervously, and appreciatively!

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      1. umashankar

        I may be wrong Bruce, but just about everything on WordPress is busy publishing a book, or at least purporting to do that. The next two books I am planning to swim through are Second-Hand Time and A Passing Shower. You can trust me on that as surely as the sinking of Everest.

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      1. umashankar

        I am getting tangled with the characters. Mercifully, Yvonne keeps pruning them ruthlessly (except the time she made a Lazarus of Vivienne). It’s been a cruel story so far.

        That windy poem reminds me of the abysmal hopelessness of attempting to translate poems complete with the nuances of a language and consciousness seeped in the notions and the culture, add to that the syntactic impossibilities. Since you might not read the original, just let me know how phony it sounds. 🙂

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        1. Bruce Goodman Post author

          It doesn’t sound phony – but I shall look at that. There is one word I thought was “wrong-phoney” but I shall review all in greater detail once I have finished cooking the dinner! The post-modern novel you’re reading is intentionally confusing – which is perhaps its Achilles’ Heel – sort of scrambled eggs. Hopefully, getting muddled doesn’t matter in the long run!

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  2. umashankar

    I trust the structure of the novel mirrors the lifelong flux and uncertainty souping up Yvonne’s mind. But it may be too early to say that. Thanks for busting the phoney thing! 😊

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      1. frejatravels

        Yes, it is a very tiny country and right at the other north of the world compare with NZ where right at the South of the world:)

        Denmark is not too bad, plenty of castles if you like it, but not much nature like NZ which I miss soo much.

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    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      You might hear criticisms from “foreigners”- but I sometimes tell this story: I was driving along a road in North Carolina following a pickup that had two teenage boys sitting on the back. A funeral cortege (hearse and cars following)passed going the other way. The boys took off their caps. Only in America!

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      1. badfinger20

        Especially in the south. I had a friend from New York visited me in Nashville and he was riding with me…a funeral procession was coming in the opposite direction…I pulled over on the side of the road and stopped…he didn’t understand why I did that.
        I told him you just do.

        Liked by 3 people

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        1. Bruce Goodman Post author

          Yes – in USA if you’re good at something everyone gets excited and gets behind you. It’s very affirming. In New Zealand if you’re good at something everyone will try to cut the tall poppy down.

          Liked by 1 person

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  6. inese

    I haven’t commented on the About, only ‘liked’. So I can leave a comment now. I have read hundreds of your stories and played your music. Cannot testify about the cooking though, but I am sure it is as good as everything else. Thank you for the generous sharing of your talents, dear friend from NZ!

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  7. Timothy Price

    I finally had time to come over and check out your blog. You’ve led an interesting life. We had billy goats when I was a kid. They are fun and ornery. You taught pipe organ? There is not a lot of pipe organists around these days. We heard a wonderful recital by Henco De Berg playing Notre Dame’s pipe organ in 2013. I like your music. I listened to several pieces. That’s really cool, maybe hot, that you live next to a volcano. We have the Valles Caldera 50 miles (80Km) north of where we live. It’s an old volcano that blew it’s top about one and a quarter million years ago leaving a 13-mile (22Km) wide caldera at an altitude of 11,253-foot (3,430 m) above sea level. We also have three small volcanos on the west side of Albuquerque. Fortunately, our volcanoes are not expected to erupt anytime soon, however, there is a resurgent dome in the Valles Caldera. I am happy I finally made over to check things out.

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    1. Bruce Post author

      Thanks Timothy – and welcome! I too have been poking around your blog getting to know you! My partner lived in Albuquerque for ten years (before we met) so I feel like I know some of the streets!

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      1. Timothy Price

        You have some familiarity with the area then. I live north of Albuquerque in Corrales. Our neighbors moved to New Zealand 6 or 7 years ago. How did you meet a former Burqueño?

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I delight in having my dull life coloured by your intelligent perceptions, your wit, and your vivacity.

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