Tag Archives: christmas

1067. Let’s all make a card

Lizzie, the teacher, planned for her class to make Father’s Day cards. Oh! But she had forgotten that Samantha’s father was dead. The class couldn’t possibly make the cards, said Lizzie. It would be like rubbing Samantha’s face in it.

Lizzie, the teacher, planned for her class to make Mother’s Day cards. Oh! But she had forgotten that Jonathan’s mother was dead. The class couldn’t possibly make the cards, said Lizzie. It would be like rubbing Jonathan’s face in it.

Lizzie, the teacher, planned for her class to make Memorial Day cards. Oh! But she had forgotten that Angela’s aunt was killed in Afghanistan. The class couldn’t possibly make the cards, said Lizzie. It would be like rubbing Angela’s face in it.

Lizzie, the teacher, planned for her class to make Christmas cards. Oh! But she had forgotten that Tareq’s uncle was a Sunni from Jordan. The class couldn’t possibly make the cards, said Lizzie. It would be like rubbing Tareq’s face in it.

At last! said Lizzie. Good morning class! Today is Buddha’s Birthday in Nepal. No one here is a Buddhist I believe. No one is from Nepal. Let’s all make a card!

1023. A goose for Christmas

1023goose

Annabelle was a bit of a snob when it came to cooking for a festal day. There was always the turkey at Thanksgiving and Christmas and hers was always bigger and better than anyone else’s.

“Oh, your turkey sounds awful. Ours was delightful! And the stuffing!”

But on a particular Christmas, Annabelle had the chance to replace the traditional turkey with a traditional goose.

“Oh, are you having humdrum turkey? That’s very run-of-the-mill. We’re having goose. Hubert’s getting one from the farmer down the road.”

Annabelle had never done a goose before. Being a domestic goose and not a wild one, it had plenty of wonderful goose fat. But who cared? Christmas came but once a year.

The goose fat overflowed in the roasting pan. The oven caught on fire. The house caught on fire. The whole shebang burnt down.

“She certainly cooked her own goose,” observed a witty neighbour.

Annabelle didn’t think that funny at all. Some people have no sense of humour.

A Happy Christmas and New Year!

Details of my Christmas crib (I think some countries call it a crèche?):

x3

x4

x5  x1

 

 

 

 

 

Apparently one of these is of me!

There is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humor.
A merry Christmas to us all, my dears. God bless us, every one!

– “A Christmas Carol” – Charles Dickens

807. Buy now!

807rome

Shall we simply say that Patsy’s daughter-in-law, Trixie, had… different tastes? It meant that Patsy had a difficult time buying Christmas gifts for her two small granddaughters. She could never gauge the… different tastes of her granddaughters’ wretched mother.

Patsy was in Rome! She would buy the little girls the cutest and most fashionable Italian outfits! No one could argue with Italian fashion. And the little girls were so vain; five-and-seven-years-old-going-on-sixteen. Patsy purchased two adorable, and not inexpensive, getups.

Christmas came! The little girls loved them! Oh grandmother! How did you know? Thank you!

But now it was the day after Christmas. There for sale online were the two outfits – bidding to start at two dollars, or a “Buy now” for ten dollars. And the seller? Trixie.

Patsy saw red. She purchased them immediately. She sent a friend to pick them up. She immediately placed them for sale online. She sold them for nine times the price.

The next time she saw her granddaughters, Patsy noticed they were wearing identical fashionable outfits from Rome.

“I bought them online,” said Trixie. “They’re Italian. Aren’t they cute?”

For once, Patsy had to admit that she and her daughter-in-law agreed on taste.

806. Christmas gifts

806xmas

Samantha wasn’t rich, but she was comfortable enough. She wasn’t that popular either. She had a few friends, but they weren’t deep friends, more acquaintances. They were enough company. She liked her own space.

She had a brother who had a family and lived somewhere way over in another place. They phoned each other for Christmas and birthdays. That was always nice. These days, Samantha was retired. She lived alone.

Christmas wasn’t a problem, but she was always a little disappointed that she didn’t get any gifts. She came up with a plan.

Quite frankly, her kitchenware was getting tatty. She needed a new colander, and new wooden spoons. The can opener was passed it, as was the corkscrew. The pots had seen better days. The oven cloth was burned in patches. The tea-towels were stained and faded.

Giving money to an acquaintance who loved shopping, she ordered all these things. “And wrap them up in Christmas paper,” said Samantha.

The gift parcels arrived! Samantha placed them under her Christmas tree.

Christmas morning dawned! Samantha brewed some coffee and toasted some crumpets. They were dripping with wonderful butter!

She sat in an armchair and opened her gifts one by one.

Her gifts were a delight!

Happy Christmas!