Music 269-283: An Eighth Little Suite in Fifteen Sketches

Hi Everyone

Here is the Eighth Little Suite in Fifteen Sketches – both audio and printable – for the pianoforte. There are 11 little suites in total.

I called these “sketches” because that is what I intended them to be. About two years ago or so I was taking a music class of 14 year olds (male and female). They were being introduced to all sorts of music. I played them “The Moldau” by Smetena because it tells a story of a river: a spring, rapids, a hunting party, a wedding, deep still water, the ocean, etc. They looked at me puzzled. How does it sound like river rapids? Why would that be a wedding party? and so on. They had little inkling of music on its own. Music was to be accompanied by a film/video/dancing… I thought that these 154 sketches might help teachers to paint pictures without pictures!

Also some piano teachers might find some of the sketches handy to help develop different pianistic techniques in their pupils… And on that note – I must admit, even though it might not sound like it, that one of today’s sketches A little two step with Scott (Joplin) I found the hardest to play out of all the 154 pieces!!

Click on a title in the first list to listen, and click on a title in the second list to download the written music.

Thanks

Click on a title to listen
1. Sibling squabbles
2. Late afternoon
3. Frolicking Scarlatti
4. Horse riding
5. A little two step with Scott
6. The magician
7. Joviality
8. Military Parade
9. Waves on rocks
10. Picking flowers
11. Skiing
12. Skimming stones
13. Grandpa’s old clock
14. View from the hill
15. Still squabbling

Click on a title to download the written music
1. Sibling squabbles
2. Late afternoon
3. Frolicking Scarlatti
4. Horse riding
5. A little two step with Scott
6. The magician
7. Joviality
8. Military Parade
9. Waves on rocks
10. Picking flowers
11. Skiing
12. Skimming stones
13. Grandpa’s old clock
14. View from the hill
15. Still squabbling

14 thoughts on “Music 269-283: An Eighth Little Suite in Fifteen Sketches

    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      Thank you, Lisa. If I’d worked at court I possibly would’ve been the fool! Your comment is a great thrill, thanks. I now (almost) know how Bach felt when he had completed his Mass in B minor!!!!

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      I play them and then tidy them up – else I would have to enter every note by mouse! Sometimes – because I get up at 4am – I will write something with the mouse so as not to make any noise. (I am a very good pianist – and pipe organist! and an even better teacher of them!!) I agree with Squabbling – but won’t change it! My favourite one in this lot is “Frolicking Scarlatti”. I’m partial to wrong notes – a feature than many pupil admires.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  1. umashankar

    I am not too different from the 14 year olds to whom you played “The Moldau” by Smetena. I keep imagining whatever the fascinating titles of those sketches tell me. I love the music, it’s frolic and turns like a mountain stream, it’s staccato akin to galloping horses, waves on the rocks, and still squabbling siblings (talk about the last one). They all portray tranquility and sooth the hopelessly frayed fibres of my heart.

    My heart goes out to the New Zealand Cricket team. They needed to be announced joint winners of the Cup yesterday. With all those convoluted rules about field placements and LBW confounded further by cutting edge but fuzzy technology, who says joint winners couldn’t have been announced? Did someone refer the decision to the Third Umpire? If ever there was a decision that needed to go up there, this was one. The English had my sympathy for inventing the original game though.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      I like the way you take the title of the music and try to imagine it!
      Re the cricket – we can’t be first at everything. We did give women the vote in 18-hundred-and-god-knows-when and have been basking in the glory of it ever since – but that’s about it!

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  2. Andrea Stephenson

    This seems like a slightly melancholy suite – not a bad thing in my opinion. I love the drama of sibling squabbles – probably because I don’t have any siblings – and I love the twirling whimsy of magician and the nostalgia in grandpa’s old clock

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

Let's brighten one another's lives with some original cliches.

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