691. Did I tell you about my grandkids?

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Let’s face it, no one in my eighty-seven years has ever listened to me. And now I’m in an old people’s home and everyone talks and talks and talks like someone might be listening. Either that or they never talk at all; like they’ve been struck mute.

Maybe they don’t talk because they’ve got no grandkids or great-grandkids like most have. And those with grandkids talk and talk and talk about them like they’re the only ones that have them. Like their descendants are the most intelligent things born since some remote ancestor in Africa picked up a cracked stone to sharpen the point of a stick.

I don’t talk much about my eleven grandkids and their couple of kids because no one listens. I talk about them though if I’m sitting in the corner with Fred. Fred always listens. He appreciates it. I tell him everything about my grandkids and he never grows tired of it. He agrees with everything I say.

Poor Fred. He’s totally deaf and he’s got some muscular complaint that means he nods positively at everything I say.

22 thoughts on “691. Did I tell you about my grandkids?

    1. Cynthia Jobin

      This eighty-seven-year-old is very endearing. Like Pauline, I started to laugh when you did….one of those contagious laughter moments when you don’t even know what you’re laughing at, you’re just laughing because someone else is laughing. I really enjoyed this, Bruce. 🙂

      Liked by 5 people

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      1. Bruce Goodman Post author

        Thanks Cynthia. I did do another recording, but I thought the old man in this version sounded so much more real – despite the laughter. So I posted it the way it was/is. However, I think the highly unprofessional laughter also points out to a listener that some stories are not to be taken too seriously! Thanks for enjoying!

        Liked by 1 person

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  1. wolfberryknits

    As someone who worked as a therapist in aged care, this one certainly has a ring of truth to it! 🙂

    Ps I finished ‘A Passing Shower’ last night and really enjoyed it. ‘Blessed are those with no punctuation’ is a line that will stick with me forever, I cried laughing. :’) Loved Peggy so much. I love how you handled so many characters and personalities so effortlessly. I found it clever and self-deprecating and entertaining, and I would certainly read more of your novels if they were there to read! 🙂 now I will get on to the autobiography…

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      WOW! WOW! WOW! Someone’s read my novel! Someone’s read my novel! Yes – I rather like Peggy! I haven’t looked at it for several years and had to do a search for the punctuation quotation! Thanks again. I am thrilled!

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  2. Oscar Alejandro Plascencia

    Bravo Monsieur. Great reading! The character voice is akin to that of actor David Kelly (grandpa Joe from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory) I loved it! Yes even the part where you crack up laughing. I’m glad you kept it. Very contagious laughter!

    Fred isn’t deaf. He’s ignoring everyone. So much more polite to feign being deaf than to rudely tell his own housemates to shut up!

    Liked by 1 person

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  3. arlingwoman

    Bruce, you were channeling Michael Caine! Of course, I cracked up when you did. At first I just read the story and was thinking how serendipitous that the narrator met Fred. Then I saw all the comments. Had no idea you did the voice. The muses have definitely not deserted you.

    Liked by 1 person

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