Tag Archives: winter

1141. Collecting for the Sallies

It was a cold winter’s day, and Evelyn had volunteered to stand outside the supermarket and ask for donations for the Salvation Army’s soup kitchen.

Evelyn: Hello. Would you like to make a donation to the Salvation Army’s soup kitchen?

Passer-by 1: Goodness. You must be freezing standing out here. Not a nice day at all, is it?

Evelyn: It’s certainly a bit chilly. Have a nice day.

Evelyn: Hello. Would you like to make a donation to the Salvation Army’s soup kitchen?

Passer-by 2: Goodness. You must be freezing standing out here. Not a nice day at all, is it?

Evelyn: It’s certainly a bit chilly. Have a nice day.

Evelyn: Hello. Would you like to make a donation to the Salvation Army’s soup kitchen?

Passer-by 3: Goodness. You must be freezing standing out here. Not a nice day at all, is it?

Evelyn: It’s certainly a bit chilly. Have a nice day.

Evelyn: Hello. Would you like to make a donation to the Salvation Army’s soup kitchen?

Passer-by 4: Goodness. You must be freezing standing out here. Not a nice day at all, is it?

Evelyn: It’s certainly a bit chilly. Have a nice day…

Poem 39: It seems we’ve entered into winter’s frost

(The poetic form selected for this month is the English or Shakespearean Sonnet).

It seems we’ve entered into winter’s frost.
Your sullen glances hold a cold distain.
Fourteen years together look as lost
And rain an icy sleet. There is no gain.

There was a springtime time when all was new.
We’d picnic in the willow’s lovely shade
And talk and dance and laugh the season through.
We thought our love was truly heaven-made.

As all four seasons come and all four go
Time turns quaint foibles into tiresome ways.
“Whose turn to cook?” is greeted with “Dunno”.
What future? How much longer are our days?

Tonight we both saw light on wedding bands;
Our children sang some songs, and we held hands.

To hear the poem read aloud click HERE.

Poems 23: The four seasons

(These limericks are the last of my first-of-the-month poems. There have been 35 poems in all. The weekly music finishes this coming Wednesday the 6th. There will have been 101 music compositions. The daily stories reach the finish line on Thursday 7th with story 1001).

WINTER

25winter

Take note that the weather each winter
Is grey and in need of a tinter
If you slip on the ice
Which isn’t that nice
Your leg’ll get put in a splinter.

SPRING

25spring

Just look at the weather each Spring
It’s an utterly pleasurable thing
It seems to get lotta
Brighter and hotta
With blossom buds blooming their bling.

SUMMER

25summer

Observe that the weather each summer
Can be a bit of a bummer
They forecast a drought
But we hardly get out
It just gets crumbier and crumber.

FALL

25fall

It seems that the weather each fall
Is worse than the autumn before
The more the rain wetters
The colder it getters
I’d rather no weather at all.

(Finally, since some definitions of the limerick say it must be bawdy and involve a member of the higher clergy…)

25pig

Did you hear of the bishop of York
Who was heavily into his pork?
Bits of the gristle
Sliced up his pizzle
So now he pokes with a fork.

To hear the poem read aloud click HERE.

983. A bit of pub gossip

983gossip

Nora: My word, it’s getting cold these day. Winter has certainly arrived.

Mavis: The first snow always starts about now. What a downfall last night!

Nora: We’ve had the fire going for over a month now.

Mavis: My husband keeps looking through the window. I tell you, if the weather keeps up like this I’ll have to let him in.

Listen to the story being read HERE!

870. Winter cold

870cold

There was no doubt it was an early frost. Mary Jane was quite unprepared. She’d cleaned the chimney over summer, but as for firewood… Not a twig.

Putting on her thick Finland sweater she had knitted, she ventured into the nearby frosty forest to collect enough wood to start the fire and at least clear the nip in the air. By the time the fire was going the sun had begun to warm the room.

That afternoon, Mary Jane went out and gathered enough firewood to last a week. She would collect more in the coming days.

The next morning it was even frostier. And the following morning, frostier still. Then the snow began. Cold, cold, cold. Mary Jane had the fire going all day.

The days grew shorter and colder. Mary Jane stoked the fire. The fire did not warm. And colder and colder grew the days. It was now so cold in the house that Mary Jane could hardly move. The damp had settled on the walls and frozen into icicles. There was no end to it.

Mary Jane set fire to the house.

To listen to the story being read click HERE!