Tag Archives: winter

1947. Seasonal Alphonso

Alphonso hated the Spring Equinox. It meant we’re heading towards summer, which is hot, sticky, and utterly uncomfortable.

Alphonso hated the Summer Solstice. It meant the hottest months are on their way.

Alphonso hated the Autumn Equinox. It meant we’re heading towards winter, which is cold, icy, and utterly uncomfortable.

Alphonso hated the Winter Solstice. It meant the coldest months are on their way.

Alphonso hated the weather on television. “They’re forever predicting bad weather. I’ll watch once they start being a bit more positive.”

1863. Late winter

It was winter – late winter – and Athol went walking. The trees were bare; the ground had mounds of rotting leaves.

Athol kicked the piles of leaves as he walked. It may have still been winter but a mellow breeze blew the loose leaves in swirls. Athol sat on a log and thought. Just before the leaves began to fall his world was a different place. He was secure in his job; secure in his family; secure in his life.

Now all had gone – no job, no family, no life. The world had changed in harmony with the season. There was no hope. He should stop pretending that things would return to normal. Things wouldn’t. He should try to move on – but how and to where?

In front of him was a broken branch. It must have snapped in a winter storm. The snapped branch looked like the head of a crocodile! Ferocious! Fearful!

Athol moved on; he couldn’t sit and mope forever. He kicked another pile of leaves. It exposed a little frog nestling itself from the winter. It was asleep. It was waiting for the warmth of spring. It would die once exposed to fierce winter elements. Athol covered the frog over with protective dead leaves.

He went on his way.

1543. Southern winter solstice

Jakob was cold. It had been a frigid winter. Jakob didn’t have much money and was out of firewood. The fireplace lay dead. The freezing outside wind seeped through the cracks in his window frames. He had covered the cracks with tape, but the wind still found a way. He was wrapped in clothes and blankets. He simply could not get warm.

Jakob had stayed up all night. Not even the bed had warmed. Jakob turned on his oven to high and opened the oven door. At least the oven heat should warm things a little. And it did. At least it did until the electric bill arrived and he couldn’t pay it. Then the electric company turned the power off.

It had been a freezing night. Utterly freezing. Jakob knew he would die. He sat in a chair and waited.

The new day dawned sunny and warm.

1507: Granny Suzanne

Over the years Granny Suzanne had skein after half-used skein of left-over wool. In her younger days she had been a prolific knitter. These days, with rheumatism and fading eyesight, her knitting output wasn’t quite so productive.

Winter was setting in. She knew that her three grandchildren living with their mother “just down the road” would be feeling the cold. She couldn’t afford to pay for their heating, but she could knit, albeit with effort. She would knit warm clothes for her grandchildren and their mother.

Scarves, gloves, socks, and woollen hats were the order of the day! A bit of red, a flash of blue, a stitch or two of green… The job was done, and most of her leftover wool was used.

The grandchildren didn’t tell granny but they hated the items. “It looks like we’re street urchins,” they said to their mother. They threw the woollen items away and went to thank their grandmother. But when they visited their grandmother she was sitting in her armchair, dead.

She had died of the cold.

1399. Seasonal felicity

Felicity’s name was felicitous. She was so full of the joy of life, always smiling, always happy, and eager to spread that elation to others. She cared about people too, especially those not as fortunate as herself.

It was no surprise when she was elected to parliament by a majority so huge that people joked that it must have been arranged by angels!

One of the things Felicity wanted to achieve was to make sure that no one went cold in the winter. “No one should have to suffer the cold during the harsh winter season,” she said, as she introduced a bill into parliament. And it got through! It passed! No one would feel cold during the winter season because they changed the official winter months to the hottest time of the year.

How felicitous is that?

Music 159: Early morning snow clearing

I remember it only too well in Quebec – early risings on freezing mornings to clear the driveway snow to get to work. It’s winter here in New Zealand now, but no snow like this. And of course, it’s not Christmas as in the picture – some place on Earth it’s the 4th of July!

Poem 80: When birds begin to sing

When birds begin to sing
I know with joy that spring is near.
Somehow, this time of year,
the birds join up in pairs and build
nests, lay eggs in song-filled
days, feed, are never stilled lest
the fledglings leave the nest too soon.

Fresh things are everywhere!
Flowers bloom! Fruit forms! The air – it cries
new life! And butterflies!
And bees! Yet here, in my old, spent
winter of discontent
I must not not forget to turn
the page, the page, the page.

(Based on the Vietnamese Luc Bat).

1141. Collecting for the Sallies

It was a cold winter’s day, and Evelyn had volunteered to stand outside the supermarket and ask for donations for the Salvation Army’s soup kitchen.

Evelyn: Hello. Would you like to make a donation to the Salvation Army’s soup kitchen?

Passer-by 1: Goodness. You must be freezing standing out here. Not a nice day at all, is it?

Evelyn: It’s certainly a bit chilly. Have a nice day.

Evelyn: Hello. Would you like to make a donation to the Salvation Army’s soup kitchen?

Passer-by 2: Goodness. You must be freezing standing out here. Not a nice day at all, is it?

Evelyn: It’s certainly a bit chilly. Have a nice day.

Evelyn: Hello. Would you like to make a donation to the Salvation Army’s soup kitchen?

Passer-by 3: Goodness. You must be freezing standing out here. Not a nice day at all, is it?

Evelyn: It’s certainly a bit chilly. Have a nice day.

Evelyn: Hello. Would you like to make a donation to the Salvation Army’s soup kitchen?

Passer-by 4: Goodness. You must be freezing standing out here. Not a nice day at all, is it?

Evelyn: It’s certainly a bit chilly. Have a nice day…

Poem 39: It seems we’ve entered into winter’s frost

(The poetic form selected for this month is the English or Shakespearean Sonnet).

It seems we’ve entered into winter’s frost.
Your sullen glances hold a cold distain.
Fourteen years together look as lost
And rain an icy sleet. There is no gain.

There was a springtime time when all was new.
We’d picnic in the willow’s lovely shade
And talk and dance and laugh the season through.
We thought our love was truly heaven-made.

As all four seasons come and all four go
Time turns quaint foibles into tiresome ways.
“Whose turn to cook?” is greeted with “Dunno”.
What future? How much longer are our days?

Tonight we both saw light on wedding bands;
Our children sang some songs, and we held hands.