Tag Archives: love

2183. Broken coffee maker

When Irene’s coffee making machine broke down she could have cried. In fact, she did. After all these years it was one of the few things left that she and her husband, Dalton, had purchased together. They had been married for forty-one years, and then he died of chronic heart disease. One by one the things they had shared together broke or got dismantled. The worst example was the passing of their cat, Topsy. Now it was the coffee machine.

With sadness Irene tossed it in the trash. But she kept the jug that was part of it. What she would do with it she had no idea. From now on it would be instant coffee in the morning. Who can afford a new coffee machine when on the pension?

She did however take herself off to the second hand shop. Sometimes one stumbled across a bargain. And there it was! An almost new coffee maker! It was a different brand from her previous one. It was well within her budget. She bought it instantly. The man looking after the shop, his name was Taylor, said he’d thought about buying it himself. His coffee machine at home had a broken jug.

Irene had the perfect solution! Her jug was the perfect match! She would drop it off at his home.

That was a few months ago. They now have two coffee makers in the kitchen.

2056. Creamed corn

Andrew was not a great fan of creamed corn. He found it too sweet. He didn’t mind shucking the corn and de-kernelling it. Then it was the simplest thing for his mother to make. But as for eating it… Goodness! Andrew thought it would be easier to eat a bowl of raw sugar.

His mother served the creamed corn as a side dish and Andrew had a spoonful to be polite because his mother had gone to a bit of trouble, both in growing the corn in the garden in the first place and cooking the creamed corn.  But sweet! Andrew always felt a bit sick.

Sometimes his mother would make corn fritters with the creamed corn and sometimes she would bake a dish of it with grated cheese on the top. She was so proud of her corn in the corn season and corn was served one way or another at almost every meal.

Things got so bad that Andrew began to wonder if he hadn’t developed an allergy. When he had a date with Angelina he would pass on mother’s corn before going out. He was very much in love with Angelina. He knew she was to be the one for life! He didn’t want to spew his mother’s corn all over the seat of the car. Tonight Angelina had invited Andrew for the evening meal. She wanted to show off her culinary skills! And guess what they had?

“The secret of making irresistible cream corn,” said Angelina upon enthusiastically placing dinner on the table, “the secret is to put several heaped spoonfuls of sugar in the mixture. It makes it much much sweeter.”

Angelina’s creamed corn was ten times sweeter and sicklier than Andrew’s mother made. Andrew loved it. In fact he had a second helping.

2029. A day on the river

(The opening sentence for this story was suggested by Yvonne of Hello World. If you want to join in the fun of suggesting a future opening sentence for these stories, please leave your suggestion in the comments – only one suggestion per person!)

“I’ll really have to think about your offer,” said Alida.

Alida and her boyfriend, Braxton, had spent the day in sunshine gently rowing up and down the weeping-willowed city river in a punt. Braxton was a farmer and a day in town didn’t exactly involve shopping but an activity that communed a little more with Nature.

It had been a lovely day and Alida had packed a picnic lunch which they had on a blanket on the river bank, half of the bread going to the local ducks. Then it was back to the rowing. Well! Almost rowing! It was more floating in the boat along with the gentle river flow.

The day was drawing to a close. Braxton had asked and Alida had replied with “I’ll really have to think about your offer.”

To be honest, her reply took Braxton by surprise. He was expecting an immediate “Yes!” Every farming boy would’ve thought so, wouldn’t you? Especially after the blissful day they had just had. Perhaps she never heard right. Braxton repeated the question.

“I’ve just killed a cattle beast for the freezer and wondered if you wanted any liver?”

“I’ll really have to think about your offal,” said Alida. She was joking of course. She loved everything a future farmer’s wife dutifully should. “YES!” she exclaimed. “Yes, Braxton, yes!” They kissed.

1918. Some things count

Bart was in love. He’d spend the time between interminably long phone calls mooching around and texting, as those in love sometimes do. He would wait, and then… The phone was never answered before with such speed lightning.

Donna was her name. They were both studying Mathematics at university. They shared the same mathematical problems on the phone. They shared the same solutions. Mathematics was never so superficial.

It was like life; they invented problems so they could solve them together. Things went swimmingly until Donna suggested:

f(x)=a_0+∑_(n=1)^∞▒(a_n cos⁡〖nπx/L〗+b_n sin⁡〖nπx/L〗 )

In response, last Thursday, Bart came up with:

cos⁡α+cos⁡β=2 cos⁡〖1/2 (α+β)〗 cos⁡〖1/2 (α-β)〗

Quite frankly Donna had had enough. She was fed up to the eyeballs. She called the whole thing off.

1732. A not uncommon phenomenon

It was St Valentine’s Day and Molly was excited. Last year her boyfriend had given her even more than a bunch of roses. She knew that the next year (which is this year) it would be a ring.

Molly rose early. Her heart soared. She dressed in casual, comfortable clothes. No good dressing up to the nines and letting the cat out of the bag. Before she had finished breakfast she had changed her attire twice. What she wore would be captured forever on her phone. Her phone was charged. She would show the photograph to her grandchildren years down the line and say, “This is your grandmother getting proposed to by your late grandfather.”

Late grandfather! Oh! How sad that day would be! for almost inevitably he would pass on first. And she, by then not Ms Molly Liggins like today but Mrs Alexander Snooks, would be left alone in her world of widow’s weeds.

And children! She had already named all three! There would be Nicholas, and Eadlin, and Lillian. Not to mention their house mortgage free and with a lovely view. And the car! “Limousine” would be a better word. She would have her driver’s license by then. It would be the first thing her fiancé would do: give her driving lessons, in between smooching and kissing in the back seat. Oh! The future! Who doesn’t dare to dream doesn’t win.

There was a knock on the door. It was the florist delivery personage. Was this the prelude? “Mother!” called Molly from upstairs, “could you get that. I’m getting changed?”

And when Molly swept down the stairs she was greeted by a bouquet of yellow carnations wrapped in black paper and a note that said “Sorry”.

Repeat of Story 134: Veljka alights

(Today we begin a week or so of repeats. These stories are not necessarily the best, or the most popular, or the ones I like. I’ve chosen them fairly much at random so I can have the week off! This story, “Veljka alights”, first appeared on this blog on 21 February 2014. Some of you faithful followers who read and commented on this story back then are now old and haggard. Enjoy!)

Veljka began to notice Ramon at school. She was becoming quite infatuated by him; his good looks, his intelligence, his laugh, his sportsmanship, his studiousness, his jovial conversations. He was beautiful. But he hardly noticed her. She noticed him, saw him, heard him, all the time. She would sit in the back corner of the classroom paying little attention to the lessons. Her eyes were on Ramon.

How natural and lovely he was when he chatted away – to everyone but Veljka it seemed. She wasn’t part of his group. For the annual school dance, he asked Cassandra to be his date. Cassandra was a nice person. Veljka wasn’t the jealous sort. But it made her sad.

One day, Veljka was on the bus and Ramon got on. The bus was full, except for one seat next to Veljka. Ramon sat next to her. Their knees accidentally touched. Veljka’s heart raced. She thought she would burst. She thought she would die. She thought she would faint. She thought she would stop breathing. Ahhhh! He didn’t take his knee away.

“How’s it going?” said Ramon.

“Ah, ah, oh,” said Veljka.

“Tell me,” said Ramon, “is your hair naturally that shade? I notice it all the time at school.”

All the time! All the time! “Yes,” said Veljka. “It’s natural. But I was thinking of dyeing it.”

“Don’t dye it,” said Ramon. “It’s beautiful. I notice you all the time.”

Notice me! Notice me!

Ramon left the bus. “Catch you later,” he said.

“See you,” said Veljka. She got off the bus at the next stop. She had overrun her home stop by seventeen minutes. She danced the eight miles home.

1693. Huberta and Hubert

As if having the name of Huberta wasn’t bad enough… She’d gone and fallen in love with a man whose name was Hubert. “Huberta and Hubert” sounded doubly bad. “You are cordially invited to the wedding of Huberta and Hubert”. And so on.

Huberta practiced writing out the combination in all sorts of situations. Mind you, she simply scribbled it in the back of a notebook. “Huberta and Hubert announce the birth of their first child”; “Huberta and Hubert are booked on a Mediterranean cruise”; “Huberta and Hubert celebrate their golden wedding anniversary.”

Huberta suddenly snapped out of her reverie when the bell rang. That was the end of Mathematics class.

Oh if only Hubert would notice her and ask her out!

1553. They shared a milkshake

(The closing sentence for this story was suggested by Maddie of Maddie’s Musings. If you want to join in the fun of suggesting a future closing sentence for these stories, click here for a peek as to what’s what.)

Marmaduke (one wonders what gets into parents’ heads when they name a son “Marmaduke”, but to each their own) was in a tizzy. Not only was it a stupid name, but “he” was a “she”. The stupid parents had given her a boy’s name because “they liked it” and “wanted a boy”.

Even though she was known as “Mamie”, the name Marmaduke appeared on official documents. The first time she went for a job interview, when she walked into the room everyone said the same thing: We were expected a man.

Now at the age of twenty-two Marmaduke decided to take things into her own hands; she would officially change her name. And that is how she became Jennifer Joy.

Jennifer Joy had barely emerged from the name-changing office when she saw on the street the handsomest man she had ever seen in her entire life. It was one of those lightning strikes that happens mainly in novels. Of course, this is not a novel. His name was Mac. As just-met strangers Jenny and Mac went off together to Burger King for a bite to eat. They got on so well. They even shared a milkshake. Before long they were dating. (I’m telling you this because frequently stories have a sad or surprise ending but there’s nothing wrong with being positive and normal occasionally).

Jenny and Mac were engaged in no time. At the wedding rehearsal Jenny got the surprise of her life. The marriage officiant referred to Mac as “Marmaduke”. It was the name on the official documentation.

“Why didn’t you tell me,” wailed Jennifer Joy. “How can I marry a Marmaduke?”

“I was too embarrassed to tell you, darling. But… Trust me” he whispered, “I have a plan.”

1549. Down on one knee

(The closing sentence for this story was suggested by Terry of ARANEUS1. If you want to join in the fun of suggesting a future closing sentence for these stories, click here for a peek as to what’s what.)

I’d put it off for long enough. Leonie-Lee was my life and light. We had been dating now for three years. It was time to propose marriage, but to be honest, what if she said “No”? The possibility of a “No” – no matter how improbable it was in reality – had always come in the way of proposing. I wish she’d taken advantage of that quirky thing (I believe it’s the case) and proposed to me herself last Leap Day.

I caught the number 12 tram. It stops almost outside my house. There’s no need to walk far except down the garden path. In fact, when it rains, I simply wait in my porch and when the number 12 tram approaches I dash out and board the tram raincoat-less and umbrella-less. Crossing the road can be a bother, but there’s a place for pedestrians to cross, although these days who can trust the road-raging drivers? Of course, I carry my coat and umbrella, because when I reach the tram stop where I alight I still have to walk a good half hour to arrive at Leonie-Lee’s house.

I had the engagement ring and everything. In fact I’ve been so excited about this decision that I haven’t slept for two days. Not the briefest forty winks.

When I got off the number 12 tram the sun was shining. The day couldn’t have been more pleasant if I’d planned it myself. I practically skipped my way to Leonie-Lee’s. This was to be the happiest day of my life thus far.

Anyway… that was a couple of hours ago. Leonie-Lee said… well… it doesn’t matter. Same as last time. Afterwards, I headed straight for home. As I stepped off the number 12 tram, dodging impatient traffic, it started to rain.

1420. The proposal

Not every match is made in heaven, but this one was. Annabelle and Xavier had met at a table tennis competition in town. It had been organised by the Trinity Anglican Parish. It was when Annabelle had beaten (just the once) Xavier at ping pong that Xavier thought Annabelle worth looking at twice.

“How would you like to go out next Saturday?” asked Xavier. That was the beginning. The sun came out from the clouds and never left.

Today Annabelle was off to see Xavier. He had something to tell her; something very important; something very special. Annabelle knew it would be a marriage proposal. She would pretend to be surprised, but really… really… how could she not guess? She wasn’t born yesterday.

Annabelle took the shortcut to Xavier’s place: over a stile, through a cornfield, over another stile… The colours that day were ten times more vibrant. A flock of goldfinches were stealing corn. “You little thieves!” laughed Annabelle. She heard a skylark sing, way up in the sky. “It’s the wedding march!” laughed Annabelle.

And there he was! Xavier at the second stile! Down on one knee!

“Annabelle,” said Xavier, “will you marry me?”

“Oh yes!” said Annabelle. “Yes! Yes! Yes!” and a second skylark joined the singing in the sky. The moon rose in the middle of the day. A briar rose near the stile burst into flower. A rooster crowed. A cherry tree scattered ripe and succulent fruit.

“Yes! Yes! Yes!”

(Post script: If you don’t like happy endings you should know by now not to read this blog.)