Tag Archives: kindness

1554. Road kindnesses

(The closing sentence for this story was suggested by Noelle of Sayling Away.

Only twice in her life had Claudette experienced kindness from drivers on the road. Usually it was road rage, road rage, road rage, as haughty drivers pushed and shoved and manoeuvred to their dominant position in the traffic circus.

The first act of kindness was years ago. It was 1965. Nanette had tried to change lanes but couldn’t make it comfortably. She didn’t attempt it again, but knew she was in the wrong lane. When she stopped at the traffic lights, the car she had tried to come in front of stopped beside her. The window came down and a kind man said, “When the lights change you go first and cross over in front of me.” And that is what Claudette did!

The second act of kindness happened just recently; in fact two days ago. Exactly the same thing happened. A kind man wound down his car window and said, “I see you’re trying to change lanes. When the lights change, you go first and move into my lane.”

How kind is that? Claudette felt like bursting into tears. Why can’t more drivers be like that? How different the driving experience would become!

The lights changed. Claudette changed lanes as she sped away. A truck coming across the intersection failed to stop.

Two days later Claudette came out of her coma. She wasn’t the least bit surprised when she woke up and found it was 1965 again.

1520: Something nice to read while having breakfast

Thelma was not well-off; in fact she was practically skint. She had three children and they lived in a little house with a fairly basic rent. Thelma’s husband had been cleaning the spouting when he fell off the ladder and landed on his head. After the funeral, Thelma tried unsuccessfully to find a job. She wasn’t skilled at much. She had very little to go on, just a few savings that were kept in a tin in the cupboard under the kitchen counter. There was enough there for five weeks’ rent and a little food and the telephone and the electricity and some school books and… By being extra careful, and by doing without herself, Thelma managed to stretch things for a week longer than expected.

But the day came… There was no money left. In fact, that was not quite true; there was a two dollar coin in the tin in the cupboard under the kitchen counter. Thelma knew exactly what she would do with it. Before moving out of the house onto the street, Thelma would spend the two dollars on candy for the kids. It was a complete waste, she knew, but it would be an opulent extravagance; a sugar-coated memory; a throw-all-caution-to-the-wind celebration. The children were at school. When they came home she would give them a chocolate each and move onto the street.

On her way out of the house she picked up a letter on the floor that had been delivered through the door earlier that morning. It was from the landlord; did she realize she had missed paying the rent eleven weeks ago? Honestly, it was enough to break the camel’s back. Thelma burst into tears. She dabbed her eyes dry, tried to look reasonably respectable, and headed for the candy shop.

Here, gentle reader, is where you step in. I know you want something nice to happen, and quickly.

Thelma was the one millionth customer to walk through the door at the candy store. She got a great big free bag of candy in all colours, shapes and sizes – more than enough to rot the children’s teeth, if they couldn’t find anywhere to use a toothbrush out on the street.

On the way home Thelma gave the two dollars (and some candy) to a woman begging on the sidewalk. Surprise! Surprise! The woman was part of a “Why-not-make-someone’s day?” television show. For her kindness Thelma won six hundred thousand dollars!

And, dear reader, if you hadn’t had such a kind heart, such a wonderful thing would not have happened to Thelma. Here’s the moral: see how you have already changed the world for good, and you haven’t even finished your morning coffee yet!

979. Increased profit

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It’s a fact of life: most people can tell the genuine from the false. People know when the waitress is genuinely interested or just trying to be nice because “that’s what she’s paid to do”.

Good service, kindness, compassionate benevolence, helpfulness – these are qualities that will bring customers back again and again. People are quick to condemn, and quick to praise. Word gets around. Self-interest and greed bring about the death of a business.

So how can we help? Let us show you how you can use these positive qualities in your business to attract more custom and make a greater profit. Teaching businesses how to make more money is our business.

892. Give a hand

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There surely is no better way to confound an enemy than to be kind. And that’s what the Three Little Pigs did; they invited the Big Bad Wolf to supper.

“Maybe,” said one Little Pig to the other two, “if we all give a hand and invite the Big Bad Wolf for supper then things won’t be too bad.”

So they all gave a hand and invited the Big Bad Wolf for supper. He came, but said he didn’t eat pork. So the Three Little Pigs had all given a hand for nothing.