Tag Archives: bucket list

1880. No bucket list

How pathetic is that? Caleb had been given six months by the specialist, and he didn’t want to make a bucket list. How backward is that? It’s not as if he was incapacitated. It would be a while before that happened. The disease would slowly work its way towards completion. There was plenty of time to write a bucket list and see the list come true. Provided it was practical.

But no! Caleb would have none of it. “Why on earth would I want a bucket list?” he said to his wife, Leticia. Leticia had been the one who carped the most about his creating such a list.

Why don’t you climb that mountain? You’ve always wanted to.
Why don’t you go to visit the Soda Factory Museum? You’ve always wanted to.
Why don’t you take up golf? You’ve always wanted to.

It seemed that Leticia had made out a bucket list for him. Of course, it was her way of coping with the impending doom that waited down the track. She was doing her best, and perhaps some of these things on the list they could do together – and for the last time. Perhaps they could make a few more memories.

In the end, Leticia won the day! Together they climbed the mountain, both physically and figuratively. “It was very satisfying,” said Leticia. “We’re both feeling pleased with ourselves! The view from the top was stunning. And such a happy memory!”

Together they went to the Soda Factory Museum. “We’ve always wanted to do it,” said Leticia. “It’s so silly really, because the Museum is just down the road. Only twenty minutes away by car. So at last we’ve done it and it was fascinating to understand the history of soda manufacturing.”

Together they played golf. In fact Caleb and Leticia went to the golf course once a week. It was a measure of Caleb’s health and strength. At first they played eighteen holes; later, fifteen holes was enough. Still later it was nine holes; then four. After that, they never went again. “But it was such fun,” said Leticia. “It was something we did together that we both enjoyed.”

The sad day arrived. Caleb passed on. No matter how prepared one is for the death of a spouse, it’s never at all like one imagined.

Cleaning out his things Leticia came across a small piece of paper tucked away as a bookmark:

My bucket list:
To make Leticia happy.

1749. A symphonic desire

Desmond had only one thing on his bucket list: to conduct a symphony orchestra. For over thirty years Desmond had been to every concert the national orchestra had staged in his home city. If only he could wave the baton for one minute! He would slow the orchestra down; he would speed the orchestra up; he would increase the volume; he would lower the volume. Such power at the tip of a little stick!

Of course, he would need to have the music and all the parts written out for each instrument. Desmond had a piano background from way back, so preparing the music was nothing. Selecting the piece of music was more problematic. In the end he chose to conduct Percy Grainger’s 1918 arrangement of Country Gardens. It was short and catchy, and had already been arranged for orchestra. Desmond need only get hold of the parts or write them out by hand himself. And he did that; he wrote the parts out himself.

And then tragedy struck. Such tragedy happens to most of us. The doctor gave Desmond sad news: you have but a short time left. Desmond had many acquaintances and friends, but only one knew of Desmond’s sole bucket-list desire. That friend wrote to the symphony orchestra. He already has the parts written out for Grainger’s Country Gardens. He’s been to every concert in thirty years. The piece of music is short. Perhaps he could conduct it at a rehearsal? But hurry! He has but a short time left.

The symphony orchestra scribbled a reply at the bottom of the friend’s returned letter: “Certainly not”.

1324. Frederick’s tango

With the dance competitions coming up Frederick and Anika practised and practised the tango. They were very good at it.

On the evening of the competition they put their heart and soul into the event. They didn’t win, but they got second. Frederick and Anika were thrilled. Everyone said they would have got first if Frederick didn’t think he was the cat’s pyjamas. He walked around like he was the best thing since sliced bread. Even though the tango is an arrogant sort of dance there’s no need to strut up and down like a painted canary.

But only Anika knew. The tango was on Frederick’s bucket list. The doctor had given him only a few weeks.

96. Bucket List

96bucket

Malcolm was eleven years old. He was diagnosed with terminal cancer. They gave him six months. He still went to school, and wasn’t yet in too much pain.

His teacher decided to surreptitiously help. She got everyone in the class to write their own bucket list. That way, they might manage to help Malcolm fulfil one or two of his dreams. No wish too big hopefully, but something simple that they could all help with.

Chelsea was the first to give her bucket list. I want to own a pony, and a collie dog, and a trip to Disneyland, and to have my own bedroom instead of having to share it with my sister. I want to become famous and be in a magazine.

Cormac followed. For my bucket list I want to fly a plane, and also learn to scuba dive and make lots of money so I can go all over the world and especially see the pyramids in Egypt. Also to jump out of a parachute. With a parachute on. Jump out of a plane. Not jump out of a parachute!

Serenity was next. I want to become a model and also a fashion designer. And then I can wear lovely clothes. And also I want to design my own jewellery. And live in a big house. And I want to be a hairdresser and go to the Grand Canyon. I also want to be an actress and star in a movie and marry a film star.

It was Malcolm’s turn. I have cancer, and I have three wishes on my bucket list. I don’t want it to hurt too much. I don’t want to get scared. And I don’t want my parents to worry and be sad.

Serenity was at pains to point out that it wasn’t a proper bucket list. That’s not a proper bucket list, she said. They’re not things you can cross off.