2499. Pioneers

It had been fourteen months since Abagail and her son, Jimmy, had arrived in New Zealand. The year was 1841. The trip out in the sailing ship had taken several months. It had taken some time to settle in after arrival, especially with lack of work and money. Abagail’s husband had stayed in England for a few weeks longer to tie up loose ends. Then he boarded another sailing ship and headed out.

After six weeks of Abagail and Jimmy waiting, the husband’s ship never came into harbour. Perhaps it had been caught in a storm; perhaps it had sunk, as many do.

Two months passed. Three months. Abagail was out of pocket. She worked down at the wharf in the evenings, doing what she described as “woman’s work”. That is where she met Barry. And now, fourteen months later, and the courts having annulled her first marriage, or at least having declared her husband “presumed dead”, Abagail and Barry tied the knot.

It is wonderful to be able to move on after tragedy, declared the vicar at the service. It is wonderful to be able to move on after tragedy, declared Barry at the reception. Suddenly Jimmy arrived at the door.

“Mum! Mum! The ship’s come in! And Dad’s on it!”

26 thoughts on “2499. Pioneers

  1. Yvonne

    Woo boy. Then the party really took an unexpected turn.

    Speaking of which, in a way, I have my black wardrobe all ready for tomorrow, including dark glasses. I can’t believe is the last morning to have one of your tales to look forward to. 😦

    Liked by 1 person

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  2. Nitin Lalit

    Dad’s late to the party. It could be a ghost ship with zombie dad. Whatever the case, Barry’s in trouble. You know if you fleshed this out, you’d have a historical fiction/romance novel ready for publishing in no time.

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            1. Bruce Goodman Post author

              That’s terrific – and I have no doubt that it won’t be a disaster. I haven’t done anything since 2000 AD – in fact I haven’t even been to a theatre performance since then! It was probably some sort of burnout. Irving’s story should be ideal.

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                1. Bruce Goodman Post author

                  Yes – tomorrow (my time) I’m going to try to move on from the flash fiction – no regrets – but as always it’s the people one leaves behind – and not the genre! But the move to and from can be “difficult”/hard…

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    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      I had not thought of a novel until today with your comment and also Nitin’s. You might have planted seed! My first (and most successful) play was set on a sailing ship.

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      1. Sarah Angleton

        Ships make for wonderful dramatic settings. All your characters are cooped up together surrounded by what is essentially a vast, hostile wilderness. And there’s all that lovely rigging to get tangled up in.

        Liked by 1 person

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