2461. A most unfortunate episode, with a hidden moral

Before she got married, Tracey would occasionally buy and eat sauerkraut. It would come in a jar at the supermarket. All she need do was throw a few peppercorns into a pot, empty the jar into the pot, perhaps add a bit of water, and heat it up.  It was a delicious accompaniment to sausage or corned beef or something like that.

When she got married she never used it again. Tommy described sauerkraut as smelly, rotten, German cabbage. Over the forty-two years of marriage, Tracey sometimes thought of sauerkraut, usually when she passed the sauerkraut in the supermarket aisle. But no! Not a single shred of putrid brassica passed her lips during all those years.

It was sad when Tommy died, but Tracey knew that she would eventually have to get on with life. She had to remind herself that it was her life alone now; she didn’t have to compromise. She went to the supermarket and bought a jar of sauerkraut and some sausage; to consolidate her conviction of independence. She would have it for dinner.

Were the Fates laughing? Was it one of those ironies that rear its ugly head when one least expects? On the first bite of sauerkraut it went down the wrong way, and Tracey choked to death.

As the coroner joked to his colleagues, “It was a waste of a jolly good sausage”.

21 thoughts on “2461. A most unfortunate episode, with a hidden moral

    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      One of the memorable scenes I remember in a production of Brecht’s “Mother Courage” was where the three Fates were knitting and got the wool tangled so they simply cut the wool willy-nilly and of course each thread of wool cut was the life of a human ended!

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      1. Nitin Lalit

        Lol. That’s quite dark. But darkly funny. I only know a little about the fates and Greek mythology because of the video game, God of War. In that you play Kratos, who ends up killing off every god there is over the course of a few games. He wants revenge and it finally ends with him destroying Zeus. The latest one has him going after the Norse Gods. He plans on killing off Thor and Odin next, I think, lol.

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    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      I too like sauerkraut! And one of the benefits of writing this story is that I now know how to spell “sauerkraut”. When I lived in Quebec (Province) I made my own sauerkraut and it was very successful!

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  1. Sarah Angleton

    I’m with Tommy. If the stuff doesn’t kill you, the smell will make you wish it had. Actually, I feel that way about all cabbage. And my husband loves it. We compromise. He eats it when he’s out and only cooks it when I’m away. Or sometimes on St. Patrick’s Day he’ll cook it in a crockpot on the deck, and eat it outside. He’s actually really considerate about it. If I go first, I really do hope he doesn’t choke on his sauerkraut all alone in the stinky house.

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    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      That’s most considerate. Felicity from next door hates the smell of cooking water fowl and her husband Sam likes to go hunting. Presently it’s the hunting season – so we get given ducks, geese, and swans – enough to last us all year!

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