1852. After the long journey

How wonderful! Rafferty (known to his friends as Raff) belonged to the Spiggyholes Ornithologist Society. Like most bird-watchers he was consumed by a passion for observing birds. Every Saturday, sunshine or not, he would disappear into the environment with camera and binoculars.

It was on one of these Saturday excursions that Raff spied a pair of Condove Variegated Flicktails (Australissimus flickbumibus). These birds were native to a neighbouring continent and had never been seen in this country before. When I say “neighbouring”, the continent and Raff’s country were separated by a sea of hundreds of miles. The pair of Condove Variegated Flicktails (Australissimus flickbumibus) had clearly been caught in a massive storm and been blown across the ocean. It was not a migratory bird. Such a thing happened only once or twice in a century or so. If the storm-blown birds settled and reproduced they would be classified as “native” to the country because they were not introduced by humans.

Raff’s excitement knew no bounds. The Condove Variegated Flicktail (Australissimus flickbumibus) was by no means a boring bird, unlike most of the native species of his country. The native species were all black or dark grey or dark brown or dark green. Quite dreary really! Whereas the Condove Variegated Flicktails (Australissimus flickbumibus) were a bright and colourful addition to the native fauna. Let’s hope they breed.

And sing! My word! Could the Condove Variegated Flicktails (Australissimus flickbumibus) sing or what?

Raff wrote an article (complete with photographs) for the Ornithological Bulletin, a monthly magazine dedicated to the promotion of native species of birds. What a furore the article caused! Half the readers were thrilled with such a colourful and musical possible permanent settler. The rest of the readers were dismayed. The new species would undermine the habitat of the native Leaden Brown Muted Caw-caw bird (Boringdullnus dozimus).

That’s why a representative was sent by the Government’s Ministry of the Environment to shoot the Condove Variegated Flicktails (Australissimus flickbumibus) dead.

22 thoughts on “1852. After the long journey

    1. Bruce G. Post author

      The reason in fact that I’m not a propagandist for Granulomatous meningo-encephalomyelitis (GME) is because it’s not a bird; unlike the Dacelo novaeguineae and the Platycercus elegans; – both of which are delicious eating.

      Liked by 2 people

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        1. Bruce G. Post author

          Greenpeace people are my friends. I was the one who let them have half of the last hard-boiled dodo’s egg to try. We also shared info as to whether the endangered Jumpy Kangaroo was better boiled or roasted.

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    1. Bruce G. Post author

      But how would we become famous? The two birds pictured are New Zealand fantails that flit around your head when you go outside. Last week an albino one made an appearance. Crowds are flocking with their phones – swarms of them.

      Liked by 3 people

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      1. dumbestblogger

        The birds were super excited when they saw the first people with cellphones. Their scientific community went bananas trying to figure out the anomoly. ( And yes, I know I am ignoring your question. I don’t know how to answer it, so I’m pretending you never asked. Thanks.)

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  1. Yvonne

    When I come to visit you, I will smuggle a breeding pair of the Aussie fantails in my luggage. Will you promise to keep them safe and ensure they establish a big colony of these lovely birds at your farm?

    Liked by 2 people

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  2. Andrea Stephenson

    On a serious note, I find it uncomfortable when conservationists start talking about natives and non natives when it means killing off the ‘invaders’. I can understand the arguments, like our red squirrels being out-competed by those naughty grey squirrels from overseas, but it still makes me uncomfortable, where is the line?

    Liked by 1 person

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I delight in having my dull life coloured by your intelligent perceptions, your wit, and your vivacity.

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