1835. Don’t overfeed pets

When Natalie came home from school she overheard her mother say to her little brother, “You’re not to do that again. It was very naughty.”

“But the cat was hungry.”

“I told you not to feed the cat between meals. It will get fat. So feed the cat only in the mornings and in the evenings. I’ve enough to do without having to run around covering up for your naughtiness.”

Later Natalie asked her mother what was wrong with feeding the cat, and her mother said that it was wrong to overfeed pets. “You should know that because of your goldfish. You can feed them too much and they overeat and die.”

For the rest of the day Natalie noticed that her little brother was pouting. He never liked being told off, and Natalie made it worse by reinforcing what their mother had said, and told him that “he shouldn’t overfeed his cat. You are a very naughty boy” – which made her little brother pout even more.

Later, when Natalie went to feed her goldfish it almost looked the same but she was pretty sure it was a different fish.

23 thoughts on “1835. Don’t overfeed pets

  1. exiledprospero

    Bruce, how goes the battle with microbes in NZ? I have taken the precaution of enclosing my property in a plastic bubble (no longer available at Amazon, as the distributor is currently serving time in a Mexican prison for fraud and personal hygiene related issues). No one goes out–nothing comes in. Consequently, I sleep well at night. I don’t notice my PTSD for hours on end.

    I saw your message a few months ago but was unable to respond due to government regulations. One can never be too careful when it comes to a pandemic.

    My cat, aply named Wuhan, is getting fatter by the day. The pandemic is just an excuse.

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Bruce G. Post author

      Delighted to hear from you Prospero – although I was hoping somewhere someone would have succumbed to the deadly virus as a conversation piece – once of course after we are again permitted to have a conversation. I never quite realized how much I depended on people’s lips to understand what they’re saying until they covered them up. In reality, the lockdown didn’t affect me in the slightest as I rent a house on a thousand acre farm and no one ever knocks at the door except neighbours from both distant sides who come to deliver eggs and meat and honey. I gave them vegetables. So it all seemed a big nothing – except I’m a little fearful of what will occur in the antipodean winter.
      Wuhan is an excellent name for a cat, although I wonder if it might at times be confused for a bat.
      I seem to be well. My ever so slightly conservative leanings is starting to be the cause of outcry when watching the television, so I have resorted instead to playing Scarlatti on the piano. It is far more reassuring.

      Liked by 1 person

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      1. exiledprospero

        I once trained Wuhan to play a Scarlatti etude; the result was chaotic: it sounded more like Legeti to my untrained ears.

        A collective madness has descended upon us. Funny, I used to go to the grocery store without putting on a hazmat suit.

        It’s nice to converse with you again, Bruce. Must run though, having bat soup for dinner and that takes some preparation.

        Liked by 1 person

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        1. Bruce G. Post author

          Yes – I must run too. A neighbour dropped off two (dead) swans (it’s the hunting season) and I shall spend ALL DAY trying to pluck them. Enjoy your bat soup. I was rather pleased that I didn’t have to look up the Legeti reference in your comment. Must run…

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    1. Bruce G. Post author

      The swans in New Zealand are black – so not as distinguished and graceful as the white ones – and during the hunting season of about 1 month – the limit is five a day. They’re quite a common bird.

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I delight in having my dull life coloured by your intelligent perceptions, your wit, and your vivacity.

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