1823. Adventure on the high seas

Look! It’s not Maxine’s fault that her husband was a sour-puss from the second he stepped onto the cruise liner. Gordon was determined to make Maxine’s longed-for cruise as unpleasant as possible. There were several reasons for this: Maxine had been planning this cruise for a year and Gordon was sick of her going on and on about it. Also Gordon was worried, if the cruise was a success, that she’d want to waste even more of their hard-earned savings year after year on further cruises.

They had been befriended by a Mr. and Mrs. Calvin and Gail Harlick of Cabin 1763. He was a buffoon if ever there was one, although Gail was quite nice. Actually a little more than quite nice, Gordon thought. But Calvin went on and on about nothing. He would monopolize the conversation at dinner and it would inevitably be about himself. The only saving grace at dinner was that Gail sitting opposite would affectionately rub the calf of Gordon’s leg with the toe of her high heels. It was their little joke.

Maxine and Gordon were always invited back to Cabin 1763 for a little drink after the meal, but so far they hadn’t accept the invitation. And then a storm hit. It was so rough that the passengers were confined to their quarters for a brief time. Gordon insisted he and Maxine go up onto the deck. “This storm is the only exciting thing to have happened thus far on the trip.”

That was when Maxine gave Gordon a push over the side, saying “Go join Gail Harlick.”

Steadying herself against the railing, Maxine made her way to Cabin 1763.

50 thoughts on “1823. Adventure on the high seas

          1. Iseult Murphy

            Glad to hear she didn’t find the swim from Indonesia too arduous. (Seriously, I’m glad she’s home safe. The only thing worse than a cruise is being stuck on a cruise, I imagine. Nah, I know people love those things, but it must have been frightening)

            Liked by 1 person

            Reply
    1. Brieuse Bernhard Piers-Guðmund Post author

      Hee hee Nitin! The name change is both experimental and temporary. The last name doesn’t have an “o” in it but a ð – Guðmund – which is a tilted d with a line through it. Apparently it is called an eth, is Old English, and is pronounced sort of the way it’s spelt. It’s my current favourite letter of the alphabet!

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

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