1229. Paranoia overcome

Avis was paranoid, not about spiders, oh no! Not about centipedes, oh no! Not about bugs, or birds, or even terrestrial pulmonate gastropod molluscs, oh no!

Avis was paranoid about tadpoles. If those little slimy eyeballs with a tail could grow legs, what else could they do? Grow claws? Tentacles? Great gnashing teeth?

And the fact that they grew into land-hopping creatures, would they jump out of their pond and leap into her bedroom at night? Avis shut her bedroom window and drew the curtains.

And then the inevitable happened, for this is a story is it not? Avis overcame her paranoia when she kissed a frog and turned into a reptile herself. They married and lived happily ever after.

She and her husband produced a bunch of sprogs, and the sprogs lived happily ever after too. One of them was able to transmogrify into a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusc when it was called for, although eventually it was devoured by a hungry sibling.

17 thoughts on “1229. Paranoia overcome

        1. Bruce Goodman Post author

          I can’ watch videos except between midnight and 6 am – otherwise it uses it my allowance. That’s because I am living beyond the back stump. But I shall watch what you sent next time insomnia sets in!

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  1. umashankar

    This is what I read somewhere on the Internet:

    “Frogs, toads, and salamanders are amphibians. Reptiles are cold-blooded vertebrates with scaly skin that are mainly land-dwellers and lay eggs or give birth to their young on land. Unlike amphibians, young reptiles don’t start out as larvae, they look like their parents at birth. Some of them originate as Homo Sapiens Sapiens but owing to the initial paranoia they have about tadpoles they try to resolve the conundrum by kissing a frog and turning into a golden gecko. The transformation is normally followed by an intense urge to marry the catalyst amphibian and launch into wild procreation. The offspring are known to be shapeshifters and fratricidal. In extreme cases, they are known to write daily stories on a blog.”

    PS: I am quite enjoying the genre.

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      1. umashankar

        Thanks, Bruce. I don’t mind being a toad as long as I don’t end up in your stories. Dahlias are blooming aplenty in the housing enclave I live in. The trouble is, they promptly wither away before I plan and assemble my DSLR. I can shoot some more if you like them. (I don’t have a macro lens so don’t expect too much).

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        1. Bruce Goodman Post author

          I had just written a “luc bat” (Vietnamese poem form) on a dahlia when I saw your photos (poem not due to be posted until Feb 1st). The first thing I did when we moved house was to plant my dahlias – far too late. I have only dark red ones and white ones. The red have just come out (very late) and perhaps a white might open tomorrow. Regarding seeing more of your Dahlias on Facebook – I can’t find how to use it (it’s not user friendly and I’m quite a competent computer person) without exposing myself semi-naked to a presumably admiring awe-struck audience. I dare say there’s a button for “mid-your-own-business” but I can’t find it. I haven’t therefore messaged on Facebook in nearly 6 years!

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