956. Hot as jalapeño

956hot

Robbie was a bit of a bigmouth. He reckoned he could eat Mexican food as hot as they could make it.

“They can chuck in as many jalapenos as they want,” said Robbie. “It would be like eating ice cream.”

His friends made a bet with him.

“Bet you can’t.”

“Bet I can.”

“Bet you can’t.”

“Bet I can.”

Off they went to the Mexican restaurant and ordered it hot.

“The hottest you’ve got,” said Robbie. “As hot as hell. And my friends will have a dish of it too. Make theirs as hot as hell as well.”

The waiter brought out a dish each. The really hot stuff. Robbie took one mouthful and gasped. He burned his mouth. It was too hot. He drank water. That was the wrong thing to do.

In the meantime, his friends all gulped down their plates of hot Mexican.

“It’s like eating ice cream, you wuss,” they said.

Robbie couldn’t believe it. And he didn’t know that the restaurant manager was the uncle of one of his friends.

24 thoughts on “956. Hot as jalapeño

    1. Cynthia Jobin

      They say you can get progressively more able to tolerate the capcaisin in peppers the more you eat them, so the jalapeño eaters were ready for the naga. Nagas used to be the world champions for heat, winning out over the scotch bonnet which was much hotter than the jalapeño. The new world champion, is supposedly the Carolina Reaper, “hotter than hell.”

      Liked by 2 people

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      1. Bruce Goodman Post author

        I find if I haven’t had hot for a while then I’m almost back to square one (toleration-wise). What I find interesting is that here the “bell-pepper” is called a capsicum. If I hadn’t been to the States I would have imagined that a bell-pepper was some sort of jalapeno. Being an expert at Indian cooking!!!! (I took a year’s evening course once) I can make that pretty hot!

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      2. southamptonoldlady

        The Spanish naga is near that too. I am a great fan of the Dorset Naga, quite high on the Scoville scale, but it has a lovely nutty flavour and leaves a wonderful sweet after-taste. It has also been proved (according to the BBC) that capcaisin is a good fat-buster, it would have to be with all the butter (or ghee) it is normally cooked in.

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        1. Bruce Goodman Post author

          When I lived in North Carolina it was way in the country, and I was surrounded by tobacco and chi(l)li crops. The Mexicans who came to gather the tobacco harvest would eat the chil(l)ies raw as they passed. I had only to look at the plants and my mouth would turn to blisters!

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    2. Bruce Goodman Post author

      New Zealand doesn’t seem to have many Mexican Restaurants – but every second shop is an Indian Restaurant. Here, if you want Mexican, you have to make it yourself – and it’s quite popular.

      Liked by 1 person

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      1. Cynthia Jobin

        Once you rely on restaurateurs–especially chains— for your Mexican and/or Indian food, rather than cooking it at home, you are the pawn of marketing and expediency; i.e, you don’t really know what shortcuts were taken, or what’s in it.

        Liked by 1 person

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  1. derrickjknight

    My old friend Majid, who manages the Akash in Edgware Road, has spent 35+ years trying to make me sweat. Once, he boasted to a friend, that he had managed it. I hadn’t the heart to tell him that I’d had a cold.

    Liked by 1 person

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