860. Almost without sense

774senses

James lost his sense of smell.

He lost his sense of taste.

Gradually, he lost his sight.

He lost his hearing.

He still had his memory and his touch.

He wrote beautiful poetry.

24 thoughts on “860. Almost without sense

  1. Cynthia Jobin

    His good memory recalled the ‘De Consolatione Philosophiae” written by the medieval Boethius in exile, and with this in mind, and his sensitive touch to the keyboard, he began to compose his own opus— which was to become famously known as a kind of ‘De Consolatione Poeticae.’

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    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      Now you’ve got me scrambling all over Google trying to catch up. He could write it as a conversation between himself and “Lady Poetry” – “Lady Poetry” being a famous American poet. Isn’t it funny how giving something in Latin adds a touch of class!? It’s sort of sophisticated – like “Brussels Sprouts au gratin”!

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      1. Cynthia Jobin

        Latin still has that cachet, even though nobody speaks it, and hardly anyone even studies it anymore….it impresses people with its mysterious names for plants and medical problems.

        “Au gratin,” being French, is also impressive. I who am past the age of being impressed about very much can only say: everything is better with cheese; even brussels sprouts.

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          1. Cynthia Jobin

            True! We were always told to say “cheese.” But the photographer who was doing yearbook photos for my college had a different idea. He said “cheese” gives you a horsey, fake grin. He recommended we say “peaches,” instead.

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  2. thecontentedcrafter

    I have often thought that touch is a most important sense – imagine living without it …….. and of course memory will tell him what sight and hearing were like and with memory he still knows who he is and with touch he can know others. Helen Keller springs to mind …….

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Gentle thoughts and expressions of astoundedness are both gratefully accepted.

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