814. Skipping breakfast

814breakfast

Hunter Hetherington was a great proponent of the healthy breakfast. Skipping breakfast has pretty consistently been linked to health risks: high blood pressure, overweight, and an unhealthy assortment of blood-fats.

Hunter never skipped breakfast. You could say he was a health fanatic. Men who skip breakfast, he said, were 27% more likely to experience a heart attack or to die as the result of coronary heart disease. The men who skip breakfast were more likely to be single, smokers, employed full-time, to drink more alcohol, were younger, and were less likely to be physically active than people who ate breakfast.

Let us learn from what Hunter Hetherington says, as today we gather to mourn his sudden passing.

29 thoughts on “814. Skipping breakfast

      1. Susanne

        I’m not an over-careful eater. In fact, burbling away in a pot is a stew made with beef, wine, orange zest, wine (oops already mentioned that), barley, and a few carrots just for show. Added to that on the side I rustled up some home made crackers made from wonton wrappers rubbed with oil, fennel and poppy seeds, toasted up some spicy garbanzo beans, and will make some bocconcini veggie skewers for an appetizer. My guests are bringing a salad over which we’ll pour an oily dressing. Mmmm.

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          1. Cynthia Jobin

            This is the second or third time I read your referring to a “cattle beast”, which is new to me. Then why do you call your meal roast beef? Shouldn’t you— as in The Grinch That Stole Christmas—-refer to it as “Roast Beast”?

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            1. Bruce Goodman Post author

              That is an interesting – and perceptive – observation. Cow is beef as sheep is mutton and hog is pork… the division between table and field in names mostly stemming from the Norman invasion when the Lords and Ladies spoke “French” and the peasants in the field spoke Anglo-Saxon. But when it comes to “cattle beast” – the only person I knew to use the term was my Uncle Bert (a long time farmer). I have always used it because there’s a cow and a bull, but the generic term doesn’t seem to exist – as in ewe-ram-sheep – so I use “cattle beast” as the generic term. A “Roast Beast” would be any roasted mammal. See – there’s (nearly) always a logic to things!!

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              1. Cynthia Jobin

                I guess it was the term “beast” that fascinated me, because that , as you say, applies to all the mammals. Nobody that I know of, in these parts, has ever had “mutton.” We like lamb .(especially New Zealand lamb). And it’s become a fad in summer back yard barbecues to have a “pig roast.” “Cattle” comes from “chattel” which comes from “capital”, meaning any kind of property, but especially livestock. It became restricted to mean cows and bulls somewhere along the line.You are right, that there is a logic to all this—the wonderful, illogical logic of how natural language changes, grows, develops. I still kinda like “roast beast.”

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                1. Bruce Goodman Post author

                  Growing up, we never ate anything except mutton. We didn’t even know the term “lamb” as a meat. According Eric, the NZ lamb is really mutton (dressed up as lamb!) because he said in Europe lamb is just that, a baby lamb. I do prefer the taste of mutton to lamb. I think the bit “beast” appended to “cattle” is really an attempt to turn it into the singular – as “cattle” is a herd! I do like “roast beast”! We have the same trouble with chickens: male=rooster (very rarely a cockerel), female=hen; baby=chicken (we don’t usually use the word chick) and so the whole lot are called “chooks” (which rhymes with hooks/books/brooks…) Although – on the table – regardless of sex – one would place a chicken, but not in the fowl house!

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  1. noelleg44

    Amen, amen!
    Just a comment: everyone needs a little fat first thing in the AM -butter on a bran muffin, whole milk on a grain cereal – in order to get your gall bladder to empty. If you adhere to a no fat diet, you will get gall stones! Or at least gall gravel…

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Gentle thoughts and expressions of astoundedness are both gratefully accepted.

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