786. Ashes to ashes

786tattoo

Neil had a problem. There was very little space on his body left for further tattoos. The problem was, his mother had died and he needed to honour her by using her ashes for a tattoo. His father’s ashes were used to tattoo his right arm and shoulder, and his brother the left. Two girlfriends covered his chest and torso, and an old, greatly-loved aunt filled the buttocks. Two of his numerous kids were on each leg. His best friend covered his back, and another ex-girlfriend did the neck.

And now his mother had upped and died and there were very few places left on his body.

“Stuff it,” thought Neil, “enough is enough.” He took his mother’s ashes and chucked them in the trash.

You’ve no idea how relieved his mother would have been.

37 thoughts on “786. Ashes to ashes

  1. Cynthia Jobin

    Hee..hee…..I like how some of your phrases have levels of meaning, e.g.. “his best friend covered his back.”….and..” an ex-girlfriend did the neck..”

    [But couldn’t he have done something a bit more elegant with mother than to put her in the trash? It’s obvious there’s not much refined about tat lovers.]

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      I will agree that not all tat lovers are as nonchalant about their mother’s ashes as the character here, but the story stemmed from one in the paper where gang members were using their mother’s ashes for tats. It kind of annoyed me, so I tried to show no mercy!

      Liked by 1 person

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  2. noelleg44

    The picture of the tats is pretty impressive. How about using those ashes on his toes? The other possibilities are too awful to consider. However, as a mother, I would much rather be scattered somewhere!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      I would get one of those triangle emblems (that you probably don’t see over there) with “Product of New Zealand” stamped in the middle, and have it tattooed on my… What would you have?

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      Reply

Gentle thoughts and expressions of astoundedness are both gratefully accepted.

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