767. A little house

767house

A little house. Back a little from the road. On a little hill. Near a little corner. A little door. Two little windows, one each side of the door. A little chimney that sometimes smoked, but the smoke went in, not out. A little path to or from the door; it’s all relative.

No one lived there.

Twice someone knocked. Twice the door opened. Twice a visitor entered never to be seen again. But even more strange: the front doorknob was on the wrong side.

Troy was fascinated. So was everyone. Troy knocked. The door opened. He entered.

The end.

51 thoughts on “767. A little house

      1. Cynthia Jobin

        Well that’s a good author, then. Let’s see…it’s a full house, what with M. C. and Salvador, the two cats, the dog, and now Troy….and me. I hope no one else comes to the door. I just won’t answer the knock.

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        1. Bruce Goodman Post author

          But, the door handle is on the other side – so you’ve got the wrong house. (It reminds me of the Ionesco play where several pages are devoted to the couple discovering they are married because they have a daughter with one red eye and one white eye – after which, the maid points out that the wrong eye was red!)

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          1. Cynthia Jobin

            “The Bald Soprano”! I saw that performed in Boston in the 1970’s….it’s funny at first but then becomes very, very tedious…especially done by a small repertory group in a basement theatre with wooden folding chairs enough for about two hundred in the audience.

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            1. Bruce Goodman Post author

              I have directed this play – called “The Bald Prima Donna” in Non-USA English-speaking countries – 6 or 7 times. Have also directed quite a few of his other plays. Also have a letter from Ionesco saying I don’t ever need to seek his permission or pay Royalties – just do his plays whenever I want! He wrote to me and addressed it to “Bruce Goodman, Hastings”. The Post Office in Britain had written on the envelop, “Try New Zealand”. The mailman must have known who I was and dropped it in my mailbox!

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              1. Cynthia Jobin

                What a great story, Bruce! I guess if the English translation varies, we can always go back to “La Cantatrice Chauve.” (That’s fun about the address; that often happens, I’ve discovered, at least in the small towns around here.) I’m trying to remember if Ionesco wrote in Romanian first, and then was translated. Anyway, the play continues to be performed to this day in France— a testament to its touch on something true, I guess. It does seem right up your alley; Ionesco must have sensed that. 🙂

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  1. arlingwoman

    It’s been a long time since I thought of the Bald Soprano. The only thing I remember is the line “She’s wet her pants!” What a hoot that you can be found anywhere through the mails, Bruce! As for the goofball in your (once more) unreliably narrated story, he should have known better. Or gone with a crowd.

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    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      😀 My favourite line is “That’s true too” – pronounced in the snobbiest rhyming way! As for being/having an unreliable narrator – never a truer word was spoken in jest!

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  2. Keith Channing

    I’m intrigued by the smoke going down the chimney. My mind is full of questions: where does it come from? what is its nature? what happens to it once it gets to the bottom of the chimney, and why doesn’t it pour out of the front door, when it’s opened? does it somehow consume visitors? there are more – but life’s too short.

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    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      Philosophically, I tend towards an Aristotelian-Thomistic world view whereby the intellect’s proper object is a thing’s quiddity. It is something which exists in things. Hence smoke is smoke if it goes in or out, and the path is the path. I know this will help – and thanks for your questions which could be the basis of an entire book…

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      1. Keith Channing

        I did read somewhere that computers and other electronic devices run on smoke. As long as the smoke stays inside, everything is fine. If any of the machine’s supply of smoke starts to escape, however, its days are numbered!

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