757. Four sons

757sons

Marie and Nick were farmers. They had a sheep farm. They had four sons. The farm was a bit small to be farmed by four men when they left school, so Marie and Nick decided to sell and buy a bigger farm.

The farm they looked at first was a much larger sheep farm, set in the hill country towards the mountain ranges. It carried quite a few head of cattle as well.

Grant, the oldest son, fell in love with “the girl next door”. They married and (would you believe) had three sets of twins.

Brian, the second to oldest son, developed an interest in farm machinery, because of a neighbour’s tractor, and eventually moved away from the area and began his own contracting firm. He married a girl from way at the other end of the country. He’d met her at a machinery convention. They had four kids.

Gerald was the one who most liked to work on the farm. He kept it going, even when times were hard. He never married. “Never met the right one,” he used to say, although he did father a child with the local school mistress who ever so quietly “moved to another school”.

Terry was the youngest and he introduced pigs to the farm, and quite successfully. He had a pretty torrid affair with the wife of the local vicar. It was talked about for months. The woman’s husband was found hanging from the vestry ceiling, and in the end Terry and the woman moved away from the area altogether, thanks be to God.

But then, of course, none of this happened, because Marie and Nick didn’t buy this farm. They looked at it and decided against it. They bought another farm altogether, in another part of the country, and the history was therefore quite different.

51 thoughts on “757. Four sons

  1. jan

    So the vicar didn’t hang himself in the vestry and Gerald found the right one? You have a natural style of writing – neither forced nor full of artifices – thus your endings are never predicable.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      It certainly is H.B. – although I superimposed the sheep. I’m a Hawkes Bay-ite myself – having been brought up in the Springhill-Wakarara area – inland from Onga Onga! What part were you from?

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      1. Cecilia Mary Gunther

        I worked close to OngaOnga for a while but I cannot remember the name of the sheep farm. I was born on Westshore Beach in Napier and lived on The Hill for years until I began to travel.. I live on the prairies of the Midwest now SO FAR from the sea. Where are you now? c

        Liked by 1 person

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        1. Bruce Goodman Post author

          I’m in Levin! I lived in North Carolina (Asheville) for a year or two. My mother was brought up in Ahuriri and went to Sacred Heart on the Hill. You seem to have a wonderful lifestyle in the Midwest!

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      1. Susanne

        Over here in Trudeaunia there is an expression “bought the farm” which means the same thing as “kicked the bucket” or “a date with oblivion”. So, in answer to your question, I dunno.

        Liked by 2 people

        Reply
        1. Bruce Goodman Post author

          “Bought the farm” – That’s a great expression – and I shall borrow it! It’s related, no doubt, to “the funny farm”. I see where your Trudeau has been rated as a sexier prime minister than John Key our prime minister. John Key said he found it very tiresome being eye-candy!

          Liked by 1 person

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    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      It’s not just a “what if” and a “could have”. Thomas Aquinas bases his proof for the existence of a God on “contingency” – which is the “what ifs” and the “could haves”!! Gosh – I had to reread the story – it was posted so long ago!

      Liked by 1 person

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  2. umashankar

    If only Time were malleable, we could all do that. For instance, I wouldn’t work for a commercial bank…
    The twist is potent but the saga of what might have been deserves to be written in a multi volume epic.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  3. Rustic Recluse

    I like how you casually move the endings away from what readers might expect. I’m gonna track all the way back to story #1 over the weeks/months … ignore the notifications that tell you I’ve been stalking your posts!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

Gentle thoughts and expressions of astoundedness are both gratefully accepted.

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