41 thoughts on “Music 57: Lobsters

  1. thecontentedcrafter

    Really? And I expect one can tell if they are Canadian or Mainish – as one says ‘eh’ at the end of every sentence……………. I last ate crayfish in 1964 and don’t know the difference in taste as I’ve never eaten lobster. It’s the mode of dying that puts me off.

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  2. Cynthia Jobin

    I like the ditty, too, though it doesn’t remind me of lobster…they are much slower and creepier.

    We Maine-iacs export about 40% of our lobster to Canada (they have more processing plants) for re-export around the world. Canada exports about 90% of their lobster. Maine-iacs keep more of it for ourselves. 😀 Since they molt twice a year, the best months to eat them are May and December, when they are more full of meat.
    One year, my partner and I spent the summer going up and down the North Atlantic coast in search of the perfect lobster roll. It turned out that the best one was at a gritty little stand in South Station, where the trains come into Boston, not far from our home…..then there’s the time a lady in a restaurant (who was from Arizona) said to us: “You’re not going to eat…that…that INSECT! are you?

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    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      When I was in Boston a lady down the road was married to a Canadian lobster fisherman who lived illegally in the States. They couldn’t travel out of the country! So the gave me a free two-week vacation – all expenses paid – to Arizona!

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    2. Susanne

      The song makes me think of lobsters marching into a boiling pot. I haven’t been able to eat lobster in many years because I hate the dismembering business. Cynthia, we once vacationed in a New Brunswick town called Shediac where there is a humongous statue of a lobster. We stayed in a house on the main street that was next door to a lobster shack that called out orders of lobster rolls until 2 in the morning. Ah, fond memories.

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      1. Cynthia Jobin

        When I was a kid, I used to think I could hear the lobsters screaming as they were immersed in boiling water. Funny….because we don’t normally see all that about beef, pork , lamb, chicken, etc.. which don’t meet a pretty fate, either, in the slaughter; we dwell upon the killing of the lobster as a heinous thing…it’s something we do ourselves, at home, in the city..and we dismember them right at the table! There’s something honest about that. My ancestors ate meat and I eat meat….and lots of vegetables, but a vegan I will never be. The wonderfulness of lobster rolls is that you see nothing of the prep….only the delicious meat of the lobster, in toasted bread, with butter, or mayo, or whatever. Ah the joys of modern hypocrisy!

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        1. Susanne

          I like the idea that we come by our meat dishonestly! Most of us aren’t farmers or ranchers or fishers so we’re removed from the slaughter of the critters which is fine with me. I’m good with dissembling about the dismembering. Funny thing is I don’t mind tearing apart a roasted chicken or a turkey but the crunching of a lobster’s exoskeleton I find distressing.

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  3. arlingwoman

    I pictured them moving in a huge biomass along the ocean floor. Not sure where they were going in my fruitful imagination. Best Lobster roll I ever had was at a fish shack on the Rhode Island coast. Best scallops ever in Maine, but I think they were from Georges Bank!

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            1. Bruce Goodman Post author

              You have to dig for them, but you’re not permitted to use a spade. It has to be with bare hands only. Then their huge tongue makes it difficult to pull them out of the hole once you have grabbed hold of one. Having said that, they’re now a protected species so you can’t eat them at all!

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    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      Given that “red is dead” – and the fact that I possibly couldn’t distinguish the accents! – it will be difficult to be adequately informed on the matter. However, after discussion last night, we decided that a lobster was too large for an hors d’oeuvre, so apart from the turkey, we’re back to square one for Thanksgiving. Discussion about what to prepare on special occasions takes up a considerable amount of time in this household. In fact, it’s the preparation and not the devouring, that seems to be the main ingredient to a festival’s enjoyment!

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      1. Cynthia Jobin

        Yes, lobster is a scene stealer, anyway. Around here, it’s considered sacrilege to serve anything radically different from the same old, traditional Thanksgiving menu. And I agree about the preparation’s being actually more fun than the festival….after all the anticipation—lights, music, pondering and choosing gifts to give— Christmas day afternoon was always a let-down, and I always thought a gift still wrapped, under the tree, more wonderful than when it was actually opened and revealed. I’m going to trot out my “Turkey” poem to repost in a couple of weeks…

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        1. Bruce Goodman Post author

          Thanksgiving – it’s when the pine tree, wounded bright, takes it’s stand in the house…! We do Turkey, Cranberry Sauce, Garlic Mashed Potatoes, Stuffing, and Pumpkin Pie with whipped cream. The starter is the big variant. The exciting thing about a turkey is the dressing of the tree between turkey bastings and sips of wine! (And we’re not even Americans!)

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          1. Cynthia Jobin

            I love it!

            ( with giblet gravy, I presume….One of the starters we used to have, besides the ubiquitous celery sticks stuffed with herb-seasoned cream cheese, was called “Angels on Horseback”: canned oysters, each wrapped with bacon (held with a toothpick) and put in the oven, under the broiler ’til the bacon was done.)

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            1. Bruce Goodman Post author

              Great minds think alike – we have done Angels on Horseback! And also water chestnuts wrapped in bacon! Frequently we have snails. For St Nicholas’ Day (which happens to be Eric’s and my birthday and also the birthday of his late son) we always have nothing other than French Onion Soup!

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  4. Oscar Alejandro Plascencia

    I couldn’t help but envision Chef Louis from The Little Mermaid prancing about the kitchen to your tune. Except this time your lobsters are singing (12sec-22sec) “do not eat us, we’re not dead. we taste like moldy bread. do not cook us Chef Louis, this we beg you please!”

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