753. Down on the farm

753farm

Jenny’s been a widow now for three years. She seems to have managed quite well. Before Hubert’s death they had a small farm. It was more than a life-style; it was an income. They survived off the land.

When Hubert died, Jenny took over. It was as if she had farmed all her life. In fact, she had farmed all her life. It wasn’t as if she had pottered at the kitchen sink while her husband ploughed and made hay while the sun shone. She had been out there doing as much as her husband. They had been a team.

And now she was on her own and more than managing; although the farm needed a few improvements she could ill afford.

So Jenny decided to “rent out” the land to Harry, a nearby neighbouring farmer – in exchange for him replacing the farm gates. He moved in a herd of cattle. Then Jenny decided to “rent out” the land to Phil, a nearby neighbouring farmer – in exchange for him replacing the farm water troughs. He moved in a flock of sheep. Then Jenny decided to “rent out” the land to Dave, a nearby neighbouring farmer – in exchange for him replacing a few of the farm fences. He began to plough a field for a crop. Then Jenny told yet another neighbour that they would be welcome to have a go-cart course for the kids around a hillock on the property…

These days, Jenny’s in the hospital. She can’t remember much. And down on the farm there’s hell to play.

61 thoughts on “753. Down on the farm

            1. Cynthia Jobin

              Indeed you did….and you do….you have “awakened me from my dogmatic slumber” and I am very happy to have befriended wonderful aussies and kiwis (another term I didn’t know, and thought of only as a small fuzzy- skinned green fruit..)..though I think dressing all in black–while it makes one look more svelte—
              can prove to be a trial when you live with cats and dogs….

              Liked by 2 people

              Reply
              1. thecontentedcrafter

                We are here to help 😀
                Did you know that ‘kiwis’ the fruit used to be called ‘Chinese gooseberries’ when I was a child and became ‘kiwis’ when we [by ‘we’ I mean our farmers who were tired of coping with falling sheep prices] discovered how to grow and export them and the name was a marketing challenge. The name change was a marketing triumph 🙂

                Liked by 3 people

                Reply
            1. Cynthia Jobin

              Thank you, Shubha! I can see how that “v” might have turned into a “b” and the sound of it to an English-hearing ear would turn from “vilayati” into “blighty”…..the evolution of natural language is such a a wonderful path of twists and turns!

              Liked by 3 people

              Reply
      1. Susanne

        A million years ago, when I was a young dinosaur, I had a British beau who played rugby and the All Blacks were visiting. I got a little silver pin with a sheep on it. Not sure why. Baaa. Maybe because they thought I was a rugby groupie? Anyway, I do remember them doing a crazy chant at a party after the game.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply

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