728. Big words

741bigwords

Chrissie was one of many unique people who was always misusefying wrongful wordages. For explanation, she called a banana a bandana even thorough she ated a bandana every evensong for brunch. Thorough more oft than not if she had a spare ovum she would whip up an ombulette or a quickie.

Call me stupidous, but she had’ve no conceptives about gigantinormous termnoligacations. She thinked that by usefying longitudinous nomenclaturifications that she sounded more brilliantable.

Personificationally I wouldn’t be observated dead implementicating more biggest verbages as what Chrissie done.

49 thoughts on “728. Big words

        1. thecontentedcrafter

          I was probably close to twenty when I first read it and the sequels – for some reason it had escaped my book greedy hands until then. I also read Middlemarch at the same time and felt I had found my reading niche – women writing about women and life and eras that felt more at home to me than the era I was in. Thankfully that also passed 🙂

          Reply
  1. Cynthia Jobin

    I’m fearsome you are just lackadacious in appreciability of the subtile newhances of Chrissie’s vocabularisation, otherwise you wouldn’t be so demonstrable of such scornfullous, risibilitatious attitudinary veezaveez her sincere tryability to ameliorate herself!

    Reply
    1. thecontentedcrafter

      Go Chrissie!!

      I myself am intersationally dicombobulated and selfsamewise intertriqued by superfabulously unusable terminologies, obfuscations or little wordlets. The use of English what how Eric used it started me orf in ye olden days of yore – when I was made interminably aware of the ordinariness of the language disseminated about my personage by the people then in my hemisphere and in an interstellar moment of serendipitous amazement discovered I could perambulate through several dozens of obscure or newly invented wordages where two or three might have been thought sufficient by some of the lesser well read of the Readers Digest ‘Word of the Day’ offerings than I myself was at that time. Methinks however that it is probably time i investigated the use of commas, periods and other usual grammatical interlocutory type of thingys.

      Reply
              1. Cynthia Jobin

                Heck, I don’t have any pills to save me. But given my currently simple diet,( and the fact that I lost interest in cooking when there was no one but me to cook for) I’d probably just enjoy that lovely cholesterolly wine-braced, sugar-nutty meal and then drop dead…happy. 🙂

                Reply
                1. Bruce Goodman Post author

                  It would most unfortunate if you choked on something rather plain. I’m cooking “Swedish Meatballs” for tonight’s meal. I’ve never done it before, but I got it off the BBC!

                  Reply
                  1. Cynthia Jobin

                    Yes, wouldn’t that be a shame…. poetic justice. We used to make swedish meatballs as one of the offerings at our New Year’s Open House buffet….they’re delicious….good luck with yours!

                    Reply
        1. Bruce Goodman Post author

          Fred of Taumatawhakatangi­hangakoauauotamatea­turipukakapikimaunga­horonukupokaiwhen­uakitanatahu (which is a place just north of where I live) died of Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis.

          Reply
  2. Keith Channing

    I have two recollections in this arena. The first was my Aunty Lou, who was into her 70s when I was at grammar school, and regularly asked me how I was getting on with my mathadematics. The second was a friend with whom I worked in Tanzania. ‘Thank you, boss’, in Kiswahili, is ‘Asante sana, bwana’. Roger’s party piece is summarised in this snippet of conversation with one of our local colleagues:
    Roger: Asante sana, banana
    Local: No Sir, it is ‘Asante sana, bwana
    Roger: I know, but I can’t say bwana, so I have to say banana

    Reply

You don't have to be a fat cat to chat...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.