712. Everyday citizens need a champion

712susan

Susan was a solo mother of three. The kids’ father had upped and run off with some Caribbean floozy he’d met by way of work. They’d taken off without a trace, and Susan was left practically penniless. Looking after the three kids was, of course, her number one priority.

She found three cleaning jobs, which she could do one after the other on an almost daily basis. All the tasks were cleaning kitchenettes in three different government buildings. The pay was atrocious, but it was something to go on. It also meant she could be home by the time the children came from school.

Quite frankly, Susan worked her butt off. She would prepare some nibbles as well when on a special occasion the government department had a celebration with a few drinks. That brought in a few extra cents. She did that for about three years. Not a holiday in sight. Not a day’s break. But she managed to almost get on top. She could pay the rent and the groceries and the kids’ school expenses and their clothes albeit second hand. Nearly there! Nearly there! Thank goodness!

And then the government, to save on expenses, hired a huge professional cleaning company to do the work. It was good economics. Everyday citizens need a champion and the government wanted to be that champion. Cutting costs was one way of doing it.

Susan was left practically penniless. Looking after the three kids was, of course, her number one priority.

49 thoughts on “712. Everyday citizens need a champion

  1. redosue

    This one made me want to lie down and weep. I wonder what your genre of writing is called, not that it matters at all to anyone except me. Hyper-realism? Lately, maybe because of the news. I’m inclined to read Beatrix Potter or dip into the Epic of Gilgamesh in the original Sumerian, although the text might be a bit heavy. Maybe it’s the Trumpness of the land below the Great White North that sends me looking at black and white picture books and reading nonsense verse. Anything to lighten the mood. Maybe I just need better lamps.

    Liked by 3 people

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      1. arlingwoman

        Ha! You accuse Noelle of being Grimm-like. Gaaaa. Of course the government will probably obligate themselves for the pensions of the new contract workers, which will cost the taxpayers far more than the poor woman and her three jobs ever did.

        Liked by 1 person

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        1. Bruce Goodman Post author

          Lisa! I seem to be bringing out the thoughts of people today from their deepest recesses! (They changed the tax law in New Zealand recently for “foreign companies” so I had to redo the taxes for the last 3 years because my translation company is “foreign”. They backdated the law – more money that way – so the stories are becoming (hopefully temporarily) tinged with politics! I finished the taxes yesterday!)

          Liked by 1 person

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          1. arlingwoman

            Oh, ugh. I gave up last year on my taxes and hired someone. It’s amazing that someone with a post graduate degree who is not innumerate can’t do her taxes, but as a British friend says “I just don’t need the aggro…” And that bit about pension obligations, well, that’s straight from a US government agency’s ridiculous contracting practices….Gaaaa, she says again.

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  2. Keith Channing

    Swings and roundabouts, my dear boy; swings and roundabouts.
    No government has any money beyond what it purloins from its citizenry. The perpetual balancing act means that if it wants to give an extra pound to Peter, Paul must receive a pound less.
    ‘Twas ever thus.

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      Thank you, Derrick. More to the point, I’ve just nodded off on the couch after dinner, and – would you believe? – woken up three hours later. I haven’t done that for years. Thanks for your comment – AND INFLUENCE!

      Liked by 2 people

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  3. Cynthia Jobin

    I actually think it’s hilarious to be in the presence of several adults with no one acknowledging the elephant in the room….the conversation goes on and yet everyone is thinking who did that? I hope they don’t think it was I….Of course everyone knows who it is, if the elephant happens to toot loudly enough…

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      1. Cynthia Jobin

        Who? Moi? Never. I actually had an aunt—my mother’s younger sister—who said she never “did that.”. She was a very prudish person, and couldn’t bring herself to say “fart. My Dad had a field day teasing her.

        Liked by 1 person

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          1. Cynthia Jobin

            Yes, I know, Noble Gas. I hope you’ve enjoyed our little chatanooga chat as much as I have, (though I know it’s first thing in the morning for you), Bruce. It’s still yesterday lunch time here, and I’m off to have some Boston Baked Beans. Tah tah…….

            Liked by 1 person

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