645. Gisele begs

© Bruce Goodman 17 July 2015

645begs

Gisele lived with Zdenko (they had a baby together) in a grotty old caravan. Zdenko used to beat her up. He didn’t have a job. He sent Gisele out with the baby every day. She had to beg in the street for money.

Gisele sat cross-legged in the street holding her baby. It was illegal to beg, but she sat with a little tin in front of her. Hopefully some kind people would put money in. If she came home penniless, Zdenko would be mad.

She had sat there all morning and hardly any money had been collected. Gisele took to pinching the baby’s bottom. A crying baby always elicited more sympathy. She gathered more money that way. She pinched the baby’s bottom all afternoon and collected enough to go safely home.

Zdenko was pleased. He took the money and went out drinking with his friends.

41 thoughts on “645. Gisele begs

  1. thecontentedcrafter

    That made me feel ill! I saw mothers with crying babies and dirty children when I was in Rome years ago. And then, more recently, on the streets of Melbourne – only it was a dog, not a baby. Same dog, different owners. When I lived in the UK I was told never to give money to the beggars as so many left their posts after a good days work, returned to their lockers at Victoria Station and put on their three piece suits and went home to the big house in Islington.

    This is a powerful piece Bruce!

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      Thanks, Pauline. As I said above in a comment, I saw these women when in Rome but I think they were genuinely sent out to beg by the men. They seem to be caught in an unable-to-get-out-of trap.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
  2. Cynthia Jobin

    On a different note: I went to WP feedback and bitched about the new changes….as did many others. The “Read time” has disappeared in favor of a simple word count, and you can now go to the original site with one click of the paperclip symbol, bottom right. 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

    Reply
    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      Aha! There’s life in the old cow yet… Oops! I mean, hurrah! And thanks for doing your bit. I saw it had gone. (As the saying goes, TIME FLIES!) And I had not noticed the paperclip symbol.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
        1. Cynthia Jobin

          Funny you should ask…they are definitely associated in that they are fictional coinages, one from Garrison Keillor and the other from me and my two also fourteen-year-old roommates in a boarding school called Our Lady of The Mountains Academy. We had this game (among others) of making up nun’s names as we lay in our beds after lights-out unable to sleep. Some of them were pretty raunchy, but the idea was to make the names longer and longer (eg. Sister Mary of the Blessed Sacrament Ever Exposed).We laughed so hard sometimes we feared being discovered and reprimanded, but it never happened.

          Liked by 2 people

          Reply
  3. Oscar Alejandro Plascencia

    Great tale of truths. Sadly it is a problem perpetuated by avarice and sympathy.

    I just read a book of short stories titled “Say You’re One Of Them” by Uwem Akpan in which he pens a story called, “An Ex-Mas Feast”. He tells the same tale you wrote, but from the POV of the younger brother of a girl who is made to take their baby sibling out to the daily begging venture. Sad tale indeed. And yours was up there, neck in neck.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Bruce Goodman Post author

      Thank you. That’s an honour. I shall seek out the book, which is possibly a little more advanced than what I am currently reading: “Diseases in vegetables and how to treat them”… 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

I delight in having my dull life coloured by your intelligent perceptions, your wit, and your vivacity.

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